New Albany to support school feeding program, families in need with pandemic funding | News

NEW ALBANY — Feeding schoolchildren, aiding families with utility bills and assisting local businesses in adapting to the changing marketplace are the three ways the New Albany Redevelopment Commission decided Tuesday to spend some of its federal COVID-19 funding.

New Albany was awarded $396,000 in additional Community Development Block Grant funds. The federal money is designated for COVID-19 expenses, and the commission amended its CDBG plan by a unanimous vote to provide $100,000 to the New Albany Township Trustee’s office, $35,000 for Blessings in a Backpack and to partner with the Purdue University Center for Regional Development on an economic gardening initiative.

Township trustees assist those in need with basic necessities, and New Albany Redevelopment Director Josh Staten said the $100,000 will be earmarked for utility and internet bills. With people working from home and schools using virtual learning, access to internet is important, Staten said, which is why it

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School schedules are all over the place. More families are opting for homeschooling. | Momaha

This year, the program has 12 children enrolled on-site for support with homeschooling, at a cost of $65 a student a week for half-day sessions, Aggie said. In the past, cyber charter students have filled those slots.

Previously, parents hadn’t expressed much interest in homeschooling, she said. “Now it’s like the school system has changed,” she said. “We are moving into a different norm.”

Homeschoolers made up 1.4% of public school enrollment in Pennsylvania in 2018-19, numbering about 25,000 kids. Families opting to homeschool must submit affidavits to their school districts. New Jersey has no such requirement.

Advocates consider Pennsylvania among the most highly regulated states for homeschoolers, with state-mandated subjects, standardized test requirements, and rules that parents have a high school diploma or its equivalent. Parents must have their children assessed by a certified homeschool evaluator each year. New Jersey’s requirements are looser.

To Rene, a former high school

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Greenwich nonprofit offers grants to help special education families

GREENWICH — A Greenwich-based legal services nonprofit is accepting applications for grants to provide families of special education students with access to qualified attorneys.

The Special Education Legal Fund Inc. announced Monday that it would award grants of up to $5,000 for qualified families living in Connecticut or Westchester County, N.Y., for its Legal Assistance Program.

“Special Education Legal Fund (S.E.L.F.) provides resources and knowledge to families in need to promote full advocacy for children in the special education system,” a statement from the group said.

“Although a free and appropriate public education is a right guaranteed to all students under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, the realities of special education in the U.S. can be quite different,” the group says on its website. “Parents and educators may disagree on the appropriate education of a student with specific needs.”

S.E.L.F. was co-founded by two special education parents from Greenwich,

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‘Double billing’ loophole makes virtual school even harder for special-needs families :: WRAL.com

— A number of families with special-needs students are caught in a government loophole and can’t get in-home help as they try to navigate online-only learning with their children.

In normal times, their children are in school, getting intensely personal help in small classrooms. But with many school systems across North Carolina, including the largest ones in the Triangle, holding online-only classes, that’s happening through a computer screen now.

In normal times, the families can get federally funded waivers to hire in-home help when their children aren’t at school. But virtual learning counts as school, prohibiting parents from getting that help during school hours. Schools get federal funding for special-needs education, and in the U.S. government’s eyes, spending tax dollars on in-home help during the school day counts as double dipping.

“This money’s just sitting there,” said Jennifer Pfaltzgraff, executive director of

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Secretary of Education DeVos meets with families, officials at Bedford school

Secretary of Education DeVos meets with families, officials at Bedford school


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BEDFORD SCHOOLS TODAY, BUT PLANS FOR ONE OF THOSE EVENTS WAS CANCELED AFTER A NEW CORONAVIRUS CASE WAS CONFIRMED. U.S. SECRETARY OF EDUCATION BETSY DEVOS MAKING A TRIP TO BEDFORD’S RIDDLE BROOK ELEMENTARY TO MEET WITH SCHOOL DISTRICT LEADERS, TEACHERS, AND FAMILIES TO DISCUSS REOPENING DURING COVID-19. SEC. DEVOS: IT IS REALLY ENCOURAGING TO HEAR ABOUT HO THEY WORKED NON-STOP, SINCE THE SCHOOLS CLOSED DOWN IN MARCH, TO BE BACK TO WHERE WE ARE TODAY, WHERE KIDS ARE IN THE CLASSROOM. TYLER: DEVOS HAS PUSHED FOR SCHOOL DISTRICTS ACROSS AMERIC TO FULLY REOPEN, WITH IN-PERSON LEARNING, AND THREATENED TO PULL FEDERAL FUNDING FROM THOSE THAT DON’T, SUPPORTING SCHOOL CHOICE OPTIONS INSTEAD. SEC. DEVOS: THERE’S MORE EVIDENCE TODAY THAN SIX MONTHS AGO EVEN THAT GIVING FAMILIES AND PARENTS AND

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Families can’t switch learning options after today

Cassidy Alexander
 
| The Daytona Beach News-Journal

By the third day of school, Chenoa Yancey knew something had to change. Her children, eighth and ninth graders enrolled in the district’s virtual school, were struggling. 

Delays in starting classes through Volusia Online Learning meant her kids watched their friends go back to brick and mortar schools while they sat home and did nothing. Virtual school seemed like the wisest choice over the summer, when so much was unknown about the schools’ reopening plans. But that changed for the family. 

“We were really, really willing to take the risk of sending them back because we knew for their own mental health and their own social aspect they really needed to go,” Yancey said. “They were struggling at home.”

Families across the district have reached that same conclusion and changed their minds about which learning option they want for their kids. Some went

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Thousands of Oregon families choose new online programs for their child’s public education

As a school year unlike any other unfolds this fall, most Oregon students have no choice but to start the year online.

But thousands of families are deciding to stay online for the whole school year, even if it’s safe to return to school in-person again. It’s one sign that online education programs launched during the pandemic could last after it’s over, providing more flexibility and options for students to learn.

Some districts are starting programs from scratch. Others expanded existing ones. Either way, from Baker City to Hillsboro, educators say they’re bowled over at how many students and parents are hungry for that option this year.

Leading the way is the second-largest school district in Oregon, Salem-Keizer, which has created an online program called Edge, which stands for Enhanced Digital and Guided Education.

When the enrollment window for the new option closed in late August, co-principals Christine Bowlby and

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Wake County Families to Safely Reopen Schools Calls for Immediate Action by the Wake County Board of Education

WAKE COUNTY, N.C. – September 10, 2020 – ( Newswire.com )

​​Among the school reopening choices outlined by Governor Roy Cooper and the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, Plan B allows North Carolina students to return to classrooms in a blend of in-person and virtual instruction. Accordingly, Wake County Families to Safely Reopen Schools respectfully requests that the Wake County Board of Education (the “School Board”) finalize a clear plan to reopen schools under Plan B no later than Oct. 1 and that schools reopen no later than Oct. 22. ​

Wake County Families to Safely Reopen Schools believes in the Wake County Public School System, our school administrators, and our teachers. We believe that our community is strong and that we can create a public-private partnership to return students and teachers to schools safely, consistent with The Strong Schools NC Public Health Toolkit (K-12). Most

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NGOs provide help to children from poor families in online education

By Joymala Bagchi
New Delhi [India], September 12 (ANI): With education now being imparted mostly through digital means in view of COVID-19, it has been a challenge for people from weaker sections to get devices and internet connection for their children to continue their studies.
Though governments have made efforts to bridge the digital divide through semi-online classes and increased interaction of students with teachers over the phone, difficulties persist.
The non-government organizations have been rendering a helping hand by providing smartphones, computers, laptops to needy students and even arranging online classes.
Nivedita Dasgupta, Country Head, Miracle Foundation India, said a large section of people faces difficulties such as improper connectivity, lack of wi-fi facilities besides not having smartphones or laptops.
“Miracle Foundation India is striving to provide children with smartphones and tablets with pre-installed education applications,” Dasgupta told ANI.
The foundation has partnered with childcare institutions across the country

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‘There’s a lot of uncertainty’: Families of special education students unsure how accommodations will be met virtually | Richmond Latest News

Hanover County is preparing for about 60% of its entire student population to be back in school under a relatively normal five-day school week. The system expects 56% of the 2,600 county students who receive special education accommodations to resume in-person learning, a spokesman said.

Select K-12 special education students in Chesterfield could return to four days of in-person instruction as early as Sept. 29. Downing says her son meets the threshold to be in the first cohort, but said the school system says otherwise.

Chesterfield’s Director of Special Education Diane Glover, who did not make herself available for an interview, wrote in an email that Cohort 1 “includes students with disabilities who receive adapted instruction on the aligned standards of learning, as well as students served in the Intensive Day Program, Autism Day Program, Intellectual Disability-Severe Program and Early Childhood Special Education as determined by the IEP team.”

“We

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