History’s lessons for science and technology during COVID-19.

People stand amid rubble and bombed-out buildings.
The aftermath of a V-1 flying bomb strike in central London, June 1944
U.S. Army Signal Corps/National Archives

Anti-aircraft guns in London during the Blitz of 1940 were mostly for show. It was extremely difficult to shoot down an aircraft. The shells launched to explode in an enemy bomber’s flight path had to be timed to one-fortieth of a second, explained Future Tense fellow Jamie Holmes in a recent online event co-sponsored by Future Tense and Issues in Science and Technology.* A timing device a second off would mean an explosion 2,000 feet from its intended target.

It’s no surprise, then, that at the start of the Blitz it took about 20,000 shells to shoot down a single airplane.

Developing a solution to the problem—an electronic sensor within a shell that could detect a nearby aircraft and blow up in its proximity—was simple in theory but complicated in execution, Holmes

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Mel Carter Used Life Lessons to Become a Successful Music Exec

Growing up in another country, poor, and without a college education may lead some to stay in poverty or look to illegal means to make ends meet. But having aspirations to be a businessman like Roc-A-Fella’s Damon Dash and Jay-Z, industry executive Mel Carter knew what direction he wanted to take in life and pursued it.

Carter, who is now the senior vice president of A&R at Republic Records, is also an investor in Chef John Seymour and hip-hop artist and entrepreneur, Nasir “Nas” Jones’ restaurant Sweet Chick and owner of the Hikari-Ultra record label that is in a  joint venture with Republic. With the skills and knowledge he has acquired over the years, he managed to generate $3 million in artist merchandise and apparel sales in the last year alone.

BLACK ENTERPRISE spoke to Carter about how his ambition led to his entrepreneurial success.

How has working in the

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Texas rejects proposed LGBTQ lessons in schools as part of sex education revision

LGBTQ rights advocates are pushing back against the Texas Board of Education’s recent rejection of a proposed curriculum to teach middle school and high school students about gender identity and sexual orientation.



a group of people on a sidewalk: Students walk on the campus of Wheatley High School in Houston, Sept. 11, 2017.


© Ilana Panich-linsman/The New York Times via Redux, FILE
Students walk on the campus of Wheatley High School in Houston, Sept. 11, 2017.

The Republican-dominated board rejected a batch of proposed curriculum changes last week, striking down mandates to require students to learn about the differences between gender identity and sexual orientation as well as a proposal to teach middle schoolers about consent. The board is expected to take a final vote on any changes in the sexual education curriculum in November.

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Some proponents of the changes called the rejection “especially tragic” as research shows that most LGBTQ students don’t feel safe at school because of harassment and bullying.

MORE: What other cities can learn from

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Here are 3 real-world lessons students will learn

JJ Rosen, Special to Nashville Tennessean
Published 5:00 a.m. ET Sept. 14, 2020 | Updated 4:03 p.m. ET Sept. 14, 2020

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As many schools start to opt for online learning, here are tips to minimize distractions at home.

USA TODAY

Fall semester, winter break, spring semester, summer break – repeat.

It’s a comforting and predictable pattern that takes most of us through our formative years. There’s an 8:00 a.m. bell, class, lunch, some more class, and then we are dismissed for the day.

At the time, I felt a bit trapped by the daily and seasonal cadence of school. I couldn’t wait to get into the work world where I would finally have at least some choice about when I would work hard and when I would take a break. 

Then, after a year out of school, I realized I was struggling with time management. With no one telling

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Virtual schooling offers work skills, real-world lessons

JJ Rosen, Special to Nashville Tennessean, USA TODAY NETWORK newsrooms in Tennessee
Published 5:00 a.m. CT Sept. 11, 2020

CLOSE

Fall semester, winter break, spring semester, summer break — repeat.

It’s a comforting and predictable pattern that takes most of us through our formative years.  There’s an 8 a.m. bell, class, lunch, some more class, and then we are dismissed for the day.

At the time, I felt a bit trapped by the daily and seasonal cadence of school.  I couldn’t wait to get into the work world where I would finally have at least some choice about when I would work hard and when I would take a break. 

Then, after a year out of school, I realized I was struggling with time management. With no one telling me when to take a break, I would overwork on weekends and be tired during the week.  In my eagerness to

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