American Farm Bureau Foundation Launches ‘Easy Button’ for Elementary Ag Education

New at-home learning resources are now available to parents and teachers clamoring for content. The American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture unveiled a new webpage featuring weekly lesson plans dedicated to helping students in kindergarten through fifth grade learn where their food comes from while helping parents and teachers keep children engaged.

“We are thrilled to be launching this weekly series of virtual learning tools for parents, teachers and students,” AFBFA Executive Director Daniel Meloy said. “Providing engaging lesson plans and exciting content helps support our goal at the Foundation for Agriculture to provide an ‘easy button’ for at-home learning during this time so many of us are juggling priorities while trying to ensure kids enjoy virtual learning.”

The resource page contains free weekly activities, which focus around a central theme and can be done independently of one another. The first lesson, which is live now, is titled “Who is

Read More

Bridging the gap between farm and packhouse with provenance verification technology

The uptake of new technologies to provide traceability within the fruit and vegetable industry has increased over the last few years. This is partially in response to the recent food tampering and contamination crises, but also through an industry wide recognition that good traceability systems offer many benefits to producers.

Effective traceability systems offer specific information about the movement of produce within supply chains, data about consumer purchasing habits, increased production and logistical efficiencies, opportunities for longer shelf life and the reduction of product waste. Traceability systems rely on chain of custody data to record the movement of stock within supply chains and the record of this data begins at the place where produce is allocated a scannable label or code, which typically occurs at the packhouse.

With labelling occurring at the packhouse, a traceability gap exists in the supply chain prior to this point, where produce is still loose

Read More

Pastured meat, education core of Twisted Pines Farm; ‘We just want people to be more aware of where their food comes from’ | Woodmen Edition

BLACK FOREST • Although the presence of COVID-19 has made it difficult, providing education on raising animals for healthy consumption has been a backbone of Twisted Pines Farm.

Twisted Pines Farm and its owners Grant and Alison Goldberg raise broiler birds, beef, lamb and pork on their farm in Black Forest. It is their mission to provide high quality, sustainably farmed, locally raised food that is affordable and available to their community.

Learn More

For more information on Twisted Pines Farm’s products and education efforts, visit the website, TwistedPinesFarm.com.

The animals at Twisted Pines Farm are pastured, free-range products. All of the farm’s ruminant animals — those with four-chambered stomachs, such as cows and sheep — are grass-fed. The pigs and poultry, including free-range chicken and turkeys, are provided a supplemental feed milled from La Junta, as those animals are omnivores.

“We don’t do confinement housing,” said Grant Goldberg, a

Read More