Trump calls for ‘patriotic education,’ says anti-racism teachings are ‘child abuse’

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump accused schools of teaching students “hateful lies about this country” and said he would be taking steps to “restore patriotic education” as he continued his opposition to efforts to raise awareness about racial inequalities.

Speaking at what the White House described as a “conference on American history,” Trump said that he plans to sign an executive order soon to create a “national commission to support patriotic education” called the 1776 Commission and that he is directing funding to create a patriotic curriculum for schools.

“Our youth will be taught to love America with all of their heart and all of their souls,” Trump said. The White House declined to say when Trump would sign the executive order.

Trump said the framing of history around race was “toxic propaganda” and “a form of child abuse in the truest sense of those words” — specifically calling out

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New York education leader convicted for child sex crime

GREEN BAY, Wis. — A high-ranking New York City education official and former Wisconsin principal accused of swapping explicit sexual images with a 15-year-old boy has been convicted in federal court.

David Hay, 40, pleaded guilty Tuesday to child enticement and possession of child pornography. Court documents show that Hay exchanged emails with the boy. During the course of these communications, the defendant received sexually explicit digital images and videos from the child. Hay also provided sexually explicit images of himself to the 15-year-old.

Hay, of Brooklyn, New York, faces up to 20 years in prison. Sentencing is set for Dec. 18 in Green Bay.

Hay served as principal at Tomah High School from 2011 to 2014. Prior to that he was an administrator at Kettle Moraine High School in southeastern Wisconsin. Most recently, Hay served as deputy chief of staff to the New York City Chancellor of Schools.

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Pandemic threatens child education, health gains: World Bank

The coronavirus pandemic threatens to erase progress made in the last decade in improving child education and health, particularly in the poorest countries, the World Bank said on Wednesday.

The conclusion comes in the Washington-based development lender’s Human Capital Index for 2020, which ranks countries on how well children are prepared for the future, with an emphasis on factors like schooling and healthcare.

This year’s report shows that most countries, particularly poorer ones, have made steady gains in improving health and education prior to the pandemic.

Despite that, the bank said in a statement a child in a low-income country will likely achieve only 56 percent of their human capital compared to one with access to a complete education and full healthcare.

The indicator purports to measure the level in life that a child born today can hope to reach by age 18.

World Bank President David Malpass told reporters

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Child care providers step up for remote back-to-school as Kansas considers funding – News – The Topeka Capital-Journal

When back-to-school day was approaching, Victor Rodriguez decided his oldest child, who is registered with Whitson Elementary School in Topeka, was staying home.

“We’re not sending her to school like two days here and then online,” he said. “I decided they’re not going to school the whole year until we see what’s going on with this pandemic.”

But Rodriguez faced a dilemma: how to continue running his restaurant to pay the bills and how to take care of his three children, all 5 years old or younger, at the same time. It’s something he has juggled with since the pandemic hit.

“Having three children, it becomes very expensive to have a caretaker or day care. One is expensive already, but three multiples it,” Rodriguez said.

He came up with a solution. Last week, Rodriguez opened up California Kids Child Care to not only take care of his own children but

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Child Advocacy Center facing funding issues | News

In a normal year, more than 250 alleged cases of child abuse come into the Child Advocacy Center of Tuscola County.

Executive Director Kathleen Sweeney interviews every single child.

But this year she’s only seen 90 kids, far less than usual. There’s worry that lower number does not mean less abuse.

“There was virtual school. There were no eyes on these children. And we were very, very much concerned about what was happening. And there was no one to disclose to or report any abuse, said Sweeney.

To make matters worse, the center is in financial trouble. Due to COVID, they weren’t able to have their six-month fundraising campaign starting in April.

“People have little to no comprehension oftentimes, of the work that’s done in a center like this to help provide a safe environment for children,” explained Tuscola County Prosecutor Mark Reene.

On top of all that, the center

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College offers late-start child development classes this fall | Lifestyle

There is rising demand for educators and social workers who specialize in working with children. This fall, Cerro Coso Community College is offering a variety of late-start child development classes online designed to prepare students for employment in the field.

Cerro Coso Community College is offering late start child development classes this fall online. All three 12-week classes will begin Sept. 21 and end Dec. 12 and will require students to observe children in a group setting.

CHDV C102 (72950) – Introduction to Materials and Curriculum will present an overview of knowledge and skills related to providing appropriate curriculum and environments for infants and young children. Students examine the teacher’s role in supporting development by using observation and assessment strategies and emphasizing the essential role of play. An overview of content areas include, but is not limited to: language and literacy. Social and emotional learning, sensory learning, art and creativity,

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New pilot program aims to provide debt-free professional credential in child development

Eastern Michigan University’s (EMU) Engage@EMU office, Washtenaw Community College (WCC), and other local partners have collaborated on a new pilot program that will offer a child development certificate program to help county residents gain employment credentials at no cost.

 

Through the pilot program, students take four semesters of online courses through WCC and one practicum semester in Ypsilanti with another partner organization, The Collaborative: Ypsilanti YMCA Child Development Center. WCC will award college credit for the program and award a Child Development Certificate (CDC) to those who complete it, after which they can complete an assessment exam through the Council for Professional Recognition to obtain a national Child Development Associate (CDA) credential.

 

Beth Marshall, early childhood program coordinator at WCC and an early collaborator in the pilot program, says there’s a national shortage of qualified early childhood professionals, due in part to low pay.

 

“Most private child care programs

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Worlds of Influence: Understanding What Shapes Child Well-being in Rich Countries – World

New report ranks the Netherlands, Denmark and Norway the best among EU and OECD countries for child wellbeing; and highlights substantial threats to child well-being due to the COVID-19 pandemic

FLORENCE/NEW YORK, 3 September 2020— Suicide, unhappiness, obesity and poor social and academic skills have become far-too-common features of childhood in high-income countries, according to the latest Report Card issued today by the UNICEF Office of Research — Innocenti.

UNICEF’s Report Card Series — now running for 20 years — uses comparable national data to rank EU and OECD countries on childhood. *Worlds of Influence: Understanding what shapes child well-being in rich countries *uses pre-COVID-19 data and features a league table according to children’s mental and physical health and academic and social skillset. Based on these indicators the Netherlands, Denmark and Norway rank as the top three places to be a child among wealthy countries.

“Many of the world’s

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