In 2019, public school teachers were paid nearly 20% less than other college-educated workers



a woman standing in front of a window: A teacher explains mathematics during a lesson with sixth graders, who are sitting at socially distanced desks, on the second day back at class since March (during the novel coronavirus pandemic) on May 5, 2020 in Berlin, Germany. Christian Ender/Getty Images


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A teacher explains mathematics during a lesson with sixth graders, who are sitting at socially distanced desks, on the second day back at class since March (during the novel coronavirus pandemic) on May 5, 2020 in Berlin, Germany. Christian Ender/Getty Images

  • A report from the Economic Policy Institute found that, in 2019, public school teachers were paid about 20% less in weekly wages than college-educated peers.
  • This was actually an improvement in the “wage penalty” from 2018.
  • Notably, these numbers are from pre-coronavirus — and therefore pre-recession.
  • The authors of the report highlight the loss of K-12 jobs during the pandemic, and emphasize the extra expenditures that the pandemic has required.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A new report from the Economic Policy Institute (EPI) found that public school teachers were paid about 20% less in weekly wages than college-educated peers in 2019.

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Unemployment rate hits 4.1% as 700,000 workers lose their jobs since coronavirus struck in March



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Stats show 700,000 UK workers have been removed from the payrolls of British companies since March when the country went into lockdown as unemployment hit 4.1% today.

“Around 695,000 jobs lost since March as unemployment rises”

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The figures are for the three months from May to July and are worse than the quarter to June when the rate stood at 3.9%.

There are growing fears that unemployment could worsen over the coming months as the Government’s furlough scheme comes to an end.

The stats post a grim picture as the thousands of layoffs since lockdown lifted underscore the damage caused by the pandemic.

Businesses in industries such as retail, aerospace, tourism, aviation and media have been among those to lay off huge proportions of their workforce.

The Office for National Statistics said young workers had been particularly hard hit by

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Nabard to take up short term skill development programmes for reverse migrant workers



a close up of a book: Mandal said Nabard has already provided Rs 90,000 crore worth of long-term refinance to the banks for meeting credit requirement of the agriculture and allied sectors.


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Mandal said Nabard has already provided Rs 90,000 crore worth of long-term refinance to the banks for meeting credit requirement of the agriculture and allied sectors.

National Bank for Agriculture And Rural Development (Nabard) will soon start a short-term skill development programme for reverse migrants that will help them to get re-employed at the earliest. The board has initially sanctioned programmes for Uttar Pradesh, Bihar and Jharkhand and seeks to work with the National Skill Development Corporation accredited national skill development centres.

CU Bhaskar, Nabard’s chief general manager in Mumbai told Financial Express the programme would be implemented on a large scale and majority of the funding would be done by Nabard. “But the entire process would be complicated since it would involve identifying efficient skill development centres and the real needy, who would require training to get back to work. The details of

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Are Singaporean workers really losing jobs to Indian expats due to Ceca free-trade deal?



a group of people jumping in the air: Office workers in Singapore. Photo: Reuters


Office workers in Singapore. Photo: Reuters

As Singapore’s economy slows amid the coronavirus pandemic and job losses mount, people’s anxieties over their livelihoods have found a convenient target: a free-trade agreement Singapore signed with India in 2005. On social media, the Comprehensive Economic Cooperation Agreement (Ceca) is being blamed for willy-nilly letting Indian nationals into Singapore to steal jobs from locals – no matter how many times the government says it is not true.

On a Facebook post of a news article explaining that Ceca did not give Indians automatic access to citizenship, permanent residency or employment, Stephanie Low commented: “Our jobs are taken by Ceca! Wait till the ministers’ jobs are also taken by them, then they will know!”

Others, like Emran Rahman, disparagingly referred to Indians as Ceca, saying: “Everywhere CECA! Even housing estates have them around!”

On the public group SG Opposition, Michael da Silva said

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Michigan dedicates $24M in tuition-free aid to front-line workers

About 625,000 front-line workers are eligible for tuition-free college under a program created Thursday by Gov. Gretchen Whitmer called Futures for Frontliners. 

The $24 million program financed through federal CARES Act funding will help people obtain technical certificates, associate degrees and bachelor degrees. Eligibility applies to Michigan residents who have worked in an essential industry outside their home from April to June and have not already gained an associate or bachelor’s degree. 

“These men and women have emerged as the real heroes in the midst of this pandemic,” Whitmer said during a Thursday news conference.

The program, the governor said, is the first of its kind and was inspired by the GI bill that provided free college tuition to veterans of World War II and beyond. People working in the medical field, manufacturing, sanitation, retail and grocery stores are among those who could qualify.

“Eighty percent of Michigan’s high-growth, high-wage

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600 workers lose their jobs at meatworks factory



a person wearing a hat: MailOnline logo


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Almost 600 workers at Australia’s largest meat processing facility have lost their jobs as the company scales back its operations due to plummeting profits during the pandemic.

The job cuts at JBS Dinmore in Ipswich, which is the largest meat factor in the southern hemisphere, comes after the company failed to convince Federal Treasurer Josh Frydenberg to make a JobKeeper exemption. 

The company does not qualify for the scheme as its turnover has only dropped 40 per cent this year, and not the 50 per cent required by large businesses.

Bosses blamed JobKeeper for creating an ‘inequity’ in the market, with some companies propped up by handouts and others struggling to make ends meet. 



a man wearing a hat: Almost 600 workers at Australia's largest meat processing facility have lost their jobs as the company scales back its operations (pictured, Michael McCormack at the plant)


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Almost 600 workers at Australia’s largest meat processing facility have lost their jobs as the company scales back its operations (pictured, Michael McCormack at

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‘Over half’ of older workers don’t have jobs that can be done remotely

As the U.S. struggles to re-open the economy, perhaps those on the tail-end of the return will be older workers. This is the group most at risk from COVID-19 and the most wary of coming back an office or another public setting.

If they can avoid it that is.

A recent study by the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College examined the differences in the ability to work from home by age.

The report found that for many older Americans, “their ability to survive financially will depend on their ability to work from home.”

The good news is that older workers have jobs that allow them to work from home at roughly the same rate as their younger counterparts.

“There doesn’t seem to be large differences on average across age groups,” said Anqi Chen, one of the report’s authors, during an appearance on Yahoo Finance.

But “the bad news

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What Jobs Are Employers Offering Older Workers?

If you’re transitioning into retirement — or want a job during retirement — where should you look?

This is a compelling question if you’re over 60 and want to keep working. You may need to garner some extra income or simply want to stay busy. There seem to be ample opportunities in a healthy economy, which has been supremely challenging this year.

The most encouraging news, according to a recent study by the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College , is that “the jobs potentially open to older workers tend to pay better but are less likely to provide benefits.”

It’s a mixed bag, according to the research. Some employers want older workers for certain jobs, but they are rarely lucrative and may not offer health insurance. They may be best suited for workers gradually moving into retirement who have health coverage elsewhere (perhaps through a spouse or through

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Ford severance packages for salaried workers targets 1,400 in U.S.

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Ford Motor Company plans to email employees on Tuesday details for severance packages with a goal of shedding at least 1,400 U.S. jobs by the end of 2020, and the Detroit Free Press, part of the USA TODAY Network, has obtained details of the offer.

The so-called “Voluntary Incentive Program” (VIP) provides a lump-sum cash severance payment for eligible employees who elect to, and are approved to, retire from the company, according to information obtained by the Free Press and confirmed by a source close to the situation who was not authorized to release the information.  

The severance benefits:

  • Up to seven full years of service: three months severance
  • 8-15 full years of service: six months severance
  • 16-plus full years of service: nine months

The incentive package does not provide post-employment continuation of medical or dental or vision coverage or life insurance. The company declined to discuss this element,

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Free skills taught on Zoom a lifeline for workers and small business owners

Workers and small business owners worried about falling behind in a rapidly changing digital world have been thrown a lifeline by award-winning educator The Mind Lab.

The company is offering New Zealanders affected by the Covid-19 pandemic free enrolment in a course teaching everything from website creation and management to social media and search engine optimisation and business planning and finance.

Students on the NZQA accredited course will also be guided on digital project management, cybersecurity, online collaboration, and communication.

The Digital Skills in the Workplace course usually costs close to $300 but will be free for the rest of 2020.

The Mind Lab founder Frances Valintine wanted to offer the course at no cost to acknowledge the toll the pandemic had on small business owners.

She said it was a no-brainer to make the course free for eligible Kiwis for the rest of the year as New Zealanders help

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