How an unprecedented, indefinite crisis forced education leaders to change the ways school districts operate

Snowstorms. Hurricanes. Shootings. Educators and the students they serve have long been at the mercy of crises; most have some sort of plan for disasters.

But with coronavirus, a new national emergency forced districts to rewrite their playbooks. While it’s obvious how COVID-19 changed the structure of school, what’s less known is how districts had to overhaul their operations.

To continue working safely, they had to change, and fast: Lengthy in-person meetings went online, where districts had more control over interactions and public input. Transparency laws changed. Some districts, like Seattle Public Schools, enabled superintendents to spend large sums of money without bureaucracy through the end of the 2019-2020 school year. And many local districts did not let reporters observe their first days of classes, citing privacy concerns and technical issues.

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Schooling solutions amid COVID-19

This story was produced with support from the Education Writers Association

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5 Simple Ways To Maximize Your Job Search

A job search can be stressful and overwhelming, especially in the middle of a pandemic. You may even question whether it makes sense to continue to apply for positions. Yet, the rapidly changing work environment may also bring about new opportunities. Whether you’re looking for a new job or considering a full-blown career change, these tips will help you maximize your efforts during these trying times.

Adopt a creator mindset

Even amid a pandemic, it’s possible to find professional fulfillment. Successful people understand that there is only one person responsible for their career. That person is you. It’s easy to blame external factors for our failures and disappointments, but ultimately you can create the life that you want. Instead of thinking the world is out to get you,

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Column: Complete to Compete researches ways to bridge state’s skills gap – Opinion – The Columbus Dispatch

By almost every measure, Ohio’s economy has been on a roll, entering the 2020s with greater energy and optimism than at any time in decades. Having thrown off its long-held Rust Belt image, our state has embraced new technologies with a global reach and created an array of jobs for those already in the workforce as well as young Ohioans preparing for careers.

Even with Ohio’s successes, however, our ability to attract job-creating investments in new and expanded facilities has often been hampered by a mismatch of Ohioans’ skills and employer needs. The reason is that, for generations, Ohioans could achieve middle-class prosperity with a high school education or less. It is a belief that, in some quarters, has lingered. Advancements in technology and automation, however, mean that the jobs that once defined middle-class prosperity, many of them routine, manual labor, now require more advanced training. This might be even

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Management skills: Five ways building your network will help you get ahead

If you want to impress the boss, you’ll need to engage the executive team and make sure the boardroom buys into your plans for digital-led business transformation.

While the work you complete in your day job is key to building your reputation, digital leaders can also boost their engagement skills by the things they do outside the immediate workplace. Here are five tips to boost your network.

1. Broaden your experiences to bolster your knowledge

Trainline CTO Mark Holt says building experiences is crucial for any IT professional. He tells his staff about the importance of getting out and engaging with the wider tech community, including forwarding a stream of invites to events.

“You hear what people are talking about and you hear what’s interesting in the wider industry. It’s just about building that network and building that community of other people that you can have a conversation with,” he

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India, Canada discuss ways to strengthen collaboration in science and technology

Highlighting the importance of Indo-Canadian S&T cooperation, DST Secretary Ashutosh Sharma said it should be explored as to how the cooperation can be taken to a different level.

India and Canada discussed ways to ramp up cooperation in science and technology by strengthening existing international connections, sharing best practices, and initiating new collaborations between governments and institutions, a statement said on Monday.

The statement follows a conference organised virtually by the India-Canada Centre for Innovative Multidisciplinary Partnership to Accelerate Community Transformation and Sustainability (IC-IMPACTS) on August 6.

In the Round Table following the inauguration of the conference, detailed presentations were made on bilateral activities being pursued under the Department of Science & Technology-Department of Biotechnology (DBT)-IC-IMPACTS programme, the statement said.

DST International Cooperation Adviser and Head S.K. Varshney highlighted joint research in emerging sciences with potential for translating research into marketable applications of social relevance, it said.

Highlighting the importance

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10 ways assessment reform can help guide a new era in education

The spread of the coronavirus transformed our education system overnight. With school districts completely caught off-guard by the speed and severity of the outbreak, the U.S. Department of Education announced flexibility for states to cancel their annual summative assessments and accountability ratings for the 2019-2020 school year.

As the start of a new school year rapidly approaches, it is still not clear what form schools will take. Prioritizing the creation of a healthy environment where students can continue to learn should be paramount. In this unpredictable environment, education leaders have expressed interest in assessment and accountability flexibility. However, as policy makers determine what that flexibility looks like, they should consider the consequences of pausing testing for another year.

Related content: 3 digital strategies to deal with assessment

Now more than ever, states must find a way to assess student learning. Failure to capture where students are this fall and how

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