Massive Siberian craters could be tied to climate change | Science and technology

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Crater

An aerial view taken from a helicopter shows a crater on the Yamal Peninsula in northern Siberia.




YAMAL PENINSULA, Russia — A Russian TV crew flying over the Siberian tundra this summer spotted a massive crater 30 meters (100 feet) deep and 20 meters wide — striking in its size, symmetry and the explosive force of nature that it must have taken to have created it.

Scientists are not sure exactly how the huge hole, which is at least the ninth spotted in the region since 2013, formed. Initial theories floated when the first crater was discovered near an oil and gas field in the Yamal Peninsula in northwest Siberia included a meteorite impact, a UFO landing and the collapse of a secret underground military storage facility.

While scientists now believe the giant hole is linked to an explosive

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Panel: New Mexico’s Outdoor Future Tied to Access, Education | New Mexico News

By SUSAN MONTOYA BRYAN, Associated Press

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The key to boosting the economics of outdoor recreation in New Mexico will require educational initiatives for school children as well as improved access and a new workforce, state officials said.

State Forester Laura McCarthy, Outdoor Recreation Division Director Axie Navas and others touted the state’s potential for growing its outdoor industry during an online panel discussion Thursday. They said efforts are underway to develop what they called a cradle-to-career outdoor education plan.

McCarthy said in developing her agency’s plan for the next decade, she realized that for every strategy that was proposed, more workers were going to be needed. She said the hope is that officials can connect residents not just with outdoor experiences they might pursue with their friends and family but with careers.

“Because the need for restoration of the places that we recreate in is so

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COVID SCIENCE-Smoking tied to COVID-19 risk; oxygen meter …

By Nancy Lapid

Sept 4 (Reuters) – The following is a roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus.

Smoking tied to higher levels of COVID-19-associated genes

Smoking appears to increase the genetic contribution to COVID-19 infections, a small study suggests. The new coronavirus enters the body by hijacking proteins on the surface of healthy cells, in particular a protein called angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). In adult lungs, just three cigarettes can increase the activity of genes with the information for building ACE2, according to an international research team led by Alen Faiz of Australia’s University of Technology Sydney. Faiz told Reuters that ACE2 levels were lower in people who had stopped smoking for more than a month. “Our preliminary data suggest that second-hand smoke exposure of 1-year-old children … increased

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