School Funding Debate Back in New Hampshire Supreme Court

The New Hampshire Supreme Court heard arguments on Thursday in the latest case over whether the state is meeting its constitutional obligation to pay for an adequate education.

A group of school districts, including the Contoocook Valley (ConVal) School District, sued the state in March 2019, alleging that the state’s funding formula for sending money to districts is flawed and forces local taxpayers to foot too much of the bill for school budgets.  

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The state’s funding formula has been challenged in the courts and adjusted in the legislature for decades. In the 1990s, the Supreme Court made a series of decisions in the landmark Claremont cases, saying New Hampshire needed to fund an adequate education with fair and equitable taxation.

On Thursday, Michael Tierney said lawmakers have not taken

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School funding debate back before New Hampshire Supreme Court – News – seacoastonline.com

CONCORD (AP) — New Hampshire’s decades-long debate over school funding again landed in front of the state Supreme Court on Thursday, when justices began reviewing a trial court ruling that left both sides unsatisfied.

In several landmark rulings in the 1990s, the court ruled that the state is required to provide and pay for an adequate education. In response, the Legislature began sending each school district a set amount of aid per pupil — currently $3,636 — but four districts in southwestern New Hampshire sued the state and the education commissioner last year, arguing the formula used to set that amount is unconstitutional because it doesn’t account for the real costs of transportation, teachers, or facilities.

A trial judge agreed but declined to order the amount be nearly tripled as the plaintiffs requested, prompting both sides to appeal to the high court.

“What we ask of the court is that

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New Hampshire Supreme Court hears school funding case

CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — New Hampshire’s decadeslong debate over school funding again landed in front of the state Supreme Court on Thursday, when justices began reviewing a trial court ruling that left both sides unsatisfied.

In several landmark rulings in the 1990s, the court ruled that the state is required to provide and pay for an adequate education. In response, the Legislature began sending each school district a set amount of aid per pupil — currently $3,636 — but four districts in southwestern New Hampshire sued the state and the education commissioner last year, arguing the formula used to set that amount is unconstitutional because it doesn’t account for the real costs of transportation, teachers, or facilities.

A trial judge agreed but declined to order the amount be nearly tripled as the plaintiffs requested, prompting both sides to appeal to the high court.

“What we ask of the court is

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State Supreme Court hears lawsuit over school funding

New Hampshire’s highest court is hearing arguments Thursday over how the state funds schools after a lawsuit by several districts.>> Download the free WMUR appThe school districts that are suing New Hampshire say the state is not providing enough money to pay for an adequate education.Lawyers for the school districts said the $3,700 per student that the state provides is only about one-third of what is necessary to meet the constitutional mandate to provide an adequate education. “We’re not asking that the state necessarily apply what our actual costs are,” said attorney Michael Tierney. “We are asking that the state apply a costing formula that is rational and based on real facts.”A trial court ruled in favor of the school districts, but New Hampshire Solicitor General Dan Will said the issue was never properly vetted.”How do we know that you can’t provide an adequate education based on this?” he said. … Read More

South Carolina Supreme Court justices discuss private school funding lawsuit

COLUMBIA, South Carolina — Meeting in person for oral arguments for the first time since the start of the coronavirus outbreak, the South Carolina Supreme Court heard arguments Friday over whether Gov. Henry McMaster has the power to direct $32 million in federal pandemic relief funds to private schools.

A central question of the lawsuit filed against the governor and conservative think tank Palmetto Promise Institute in July is whether the funds — the majority of the $48 million in discretionary education dollars granted to McMaster by the federal Department of Education — are considered public money, and how they can be used.

McMaster unveiled the plan for Safe Access to Flexible Education, or SAFE, grants earlier that month at a religious school in Greenville. The governor said the one-time program would cover about 5,000 grants of up to $6,500 for students to attend private schools this academic year and

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NH Supreme Court to hear appeal Thursday over state education funding | Education

The state Supreme Court takes up the contentious issue of school funding on Thursday, faced with a lower court decision that found the state’s baseline contribution of $3,636 toward each student’s education is far from constitutionally adequate.

The case, brought by the ConVal School District and three other districts in southwestern New Hampshire, marks the first time since 2008 that the Supreme Court has dealt with the thorny issue of school funding.

Rulings in Claremont I, Claremont II and its 10 successor cases have established that New Hampshire children have a constitutional right to an adequate education, and state government must provide it.

“The state’s abdication of its constitutional obligation to fund an adequate education has gone on for decades as the court has granted the state latitude, time and again, to meet its obligations without judicial intervention,” wrote Michael Tierney, the Manchester lawyer representing the school districts.

Last year,

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California Supreme Court denies O.C. Board of Education petition to reopen school campuses

The Orange County Board of Education’s bid to force California to re-open school campuses for in-person learning ended Wednesday when the California Supreme Court refused to hear the case.

Board of Education President Ken Williams expressed disappointment with the ruling.

“I am sorry that the state Supreme Court did not view that Governor Newsom has abused his emergency powers that are given to governors under a real healthcare crisis. Our families and children are suffering from not going to school.”

Last month, the board, along with a few parents and several private schools across California, took the unusual step of filing legal actions directly with the state Supreme Court.

Two lawsuits claimed that actions by Gov. Gavin Newsom and the California Department of Public Health to curb the spread of coronavirus were unconstitutional and violated the right to equal access to education. Newsom’s order effectively closed most school campuses to

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Supreme Court stays Maratha reservation in UG admissions and government jobs in Maharashtra

  • The apex court said that status of those who have already taken benefits of the 2018 law shall not be disturbed.
  • The Socially and Educationally Backward Classes (SEBC) Act, 2018 was enacted to grant reservation to people of Maratha community in Maharashtra in jobs and admissions.

The Supreme Court Wednesday stayed the implementation of 2018 Maharashtra law granting reservation to Marathas in education and jobs but made it clear that the status of those who have availed of the benefits will not be disturbed.

A three-judge bench headed by Justice L N Rao referred to a larger constitution bench, to be set up by Chief Justice of India S A Bobde, the batch of pleas questioning the validity of the law granting reservation to Marathas in education and jobs.

The apex court said that status of those who have already taken benefits of the 2018 law shall not be disturbed.

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Supreme Court issues notice on Andhra Pradesh’s plea to make English medium of education in schools



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The Supreme Court has issued a notice on Andhra Pradesh government’s plea seeking to make English the medium of education from classes one to six in its schools.

The SC bench comprising Justices DY Chandrachud, Indu Malhotra and KM Joseph on Thursday sought response of Srinivas Guntipalli on whose plea the Andhra Pradesh High Court had stopped the implementation of the plan in government-run Telugu medium schools.

The high court in April had set aside the order for government schools to convert the medium of instruction from Telugu to English.

Advocate KV Vishwanathan, appearing for the state government, said the order during the hearing conducted via video conference.

He said a majority of parents wanted English to be the medium of education and it was a progressive, forward looking measure in accordance with the Constitution.

Advocate Gopal Shankarnarayanan, appearing for caveator, accepted the notice and will have to file response

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