U.S. corporate board diversity lags as few minority execs get top jobs: study

FILE PHOTO: The skyline of lower Manhattan is seen before sunrise in New York City, U.S., July 17, 2019. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid/File Photo

BOSTON (Reuters) – Publicly traded U.S. companies have been slow to add minority directors over the past five years even as women grabbed a greater share of board seats during that period, a comprehensive study to be released on Monday shows.

Across the Russell 3000, a broad index of U.S. companies, 29% now have two or more ethnically diverse directors, 7 percentage points more than in 2016, according to the new data from ISS ESG, an arm of Institutional Shareholder Services, scheduled to be presented at a conference on Monday. By contrast 66% of those boards now have 2 or more women, 27 percentage points more than in 2016, ISS found.

Brett Miller, head of data solutions for ISS ESG, said the figures reflect how boards traditionally recruit

Read More

Need to focus on agriculture, water resources, financial inclusion and skill development: Study

Government needs to focus on areas such as agriculture, water resources, financial inclusion and skill development under the aspirational district programme, a study assessing the impact of the aspirational district programme has suggested.

While maximum districts out of 112 districts under the programme have achieved nearly 70% of their targets under the health and education sectors, agriculture and financial inclusion are the main areas of concern for most aspirational districts as their average scores lie farthest away from the frontier. “Most of the districts are 40-90% away from their targets,” the study has found.

According to the study, in health and nutrition the economic impact of reducing severe acute malnutrition (SAM) among children is felt through the effects on productivity and lifetime learning. “The overall economic impact for all the states (only looking at aspirational districts) of reducing SAM is estimated to be a mammoth Rs 1.43 lakh crore,” the

Read More

MA Should Move $500M In School Funding To Poorer Districts: Study

MASSACHUSETTS — More than two-thirds of the state education funding that goes to school districts without regard to need goes to the wealthiest 20 percent of school districts and should be reallocated, according to a report released Monday.

While $5 billion in state education funding is earmarked for lower-income school districts, the report by the Massachusetts Business Alliance for Education and Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce focuses on the $800 million that is allocated on a “blind-need” basis without regard to need or income levels.

“If ever there was a moment to promote equity in funding education, now is the time to do it,” Ed Lambert, executive director of the Massachusetts Business Alliance for Education said. “For every dollar we send to communities that can afford to fund schools on their own we’re moving further, not closer, to equity.”

In November, the state legislature passed a $1.5 billion education bill

Read More

Biden drilling ban would cost 1M jobs and cause $700B drop in GDP: Industry study

Joe Biden’s pledge to block oil and gas drilling on federal lands and waters would force the United States to rely more on foreign energy sources, cost nearly 1 million jobs by 2022, and cause carbon emissions to increase by prompting a rebound in coal.



a man standing in front of a large ship in a body of water


© Provided by Washington Examiner


That’s according to a study Wednesday from the American Petroleum Institute, the oil and gas industry’s largest trade group.

Loading...

Load Error

The study does not name Biden, but the Democratic nominee has consistently pledged to ban new federal oil and gas leasing and development on public lands and waters.

It’s one of the centerpieces of his agenda to tackle climate change.

API’s study, prepared by the energy consulting firm OnLocation, finds a federal drilling ban would cause U.S. GDP to fall by a cumulative $700 billion through 2030. U.S. oil imports would increase by 2 million barrels a day, while

Read More

Immigrants to U.S. Help Create More Jobs, Not Take Them, Study Finds

Immigrants to the U.S. should be seen more as “job creators” than “job takers” when it comes to entrepreneurship, a new study published this month has found.

Titled Immigration and Entrepreneurship in the United States, the study, published by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), found that immigrants tend to play “relatively large roles as employers, rather than employees, compared to U.S.-born individuals.”

“People want to think of immigrants as coming into the economy and maybe not having very many skills and not having a positive impact on the economy,” Benjamin Jones, a professor of strategy at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University involved in the study, told Newsweek on Tuesday.

However, he said, “not only do immigrants start lots of companies at a much higher rate [than U.S.-born counterparts], but those companies actually tend to grow quite a lot.”

Newsweek subscription offers >

In their

Read More

Space travel can lead to new motor skills but impaired vision, according to a new study of cosmonaut brains



a man talking on a cell phone: US astronaut Jack Fischer smiles as a NASA medical staff member wipes his face shortly after he landed back on Earth in a Russian Soyuz capsule in Kazakhstan, September 3, 2017. Sergei Ilnitsky/AFP/Getty Images


© Sergei Ilnitsky/AFP/Getty Images
US astronaut Jack Fischer smiles as a NASA medical staff member wipes his face shortly after he landed back on Earth in a Russian Soyuz capsule in Kazakhstan, September 3, 2017. Sergei Ilnitsky/AFP/Getty Images

  • A new study examined the brains of eight Russian cosmonauts seven months after they returned from the International Space Station.
  • Their brains showed signs of new motor skills, but slightly weaker vision. 
  • For some space travelers, those changes could be long-lasting.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Imagine you could throw the perfect bullseye, but you’d have to wear glasses to do it. That’s a trade-off some space travelers may unwittingly make when they venture off the planet.

Loading...

Load Error

A study published Friday examined the brains of eight male Russian cosmonauts roughly seven months after they returned from lengthy missions to the International Space Station. The researchers discovered minor changes

Read More

Governor’s education advisor hits back at teacher COVID-19 safety study

SALT LAKE CITY — The online insurance company Insurify caused tension when it released a COVID-19 safety study claiming Utah’s teachers are the most at-risk of contracting the virus in the country.

But during a news conference on Thursday, Governor Gary Herbert’s education adviser Tami Pyfer hit back at several of the study’s criteria.

“Some of the things that they looked at (to determine COVID-19 safety) were … the strength of our teacher union. They looked at our teacher pay, our school funding,” Pyfer said.

Pyfer acknowledged that social distancing was a challenge for many campuses, though she believes several districts were making it work.

“There are districts that are having A-B days and having half the student population come on one day and half the population come on the other day. That is one of those mitigation efforts that, as we see cases rise at schools, they will have

Read More

India’s Gen Z Risks Getting Left Out of Formal Jobs, Study Says

(Bloomberg) — India has been struggling with an unemployment problem and the coronavirus pandemic is making it even more difficult for its youngest workers to earn a decent living, shows an analysis by the London School of Economics.



a river running through a city: A pedestrian wearing a face mask crosses an empty road near the Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Terminus (CSMT) during a lockdown imposed due to the coronavirus in Mumbai, India, on Monday, June 1, 2020. Despite a strict two-month-long lockdown, the outbreak in India’s financial capital has snowballed, with the city now accounting for nearly a quarter of India’s more than 4,700 deaths and more a fifth of India’s over 165,000 infections.


© Bloomberg
A pedestrian wearing a face mask crosses an empty road near the Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Terminus (CSMT) during a lockdown imposed due to the coronavirus in Mumbai, India, on Monday, June 1, 2020. Despite a strict two-month-long lockdown, the outbreak in India’s financial capital has snowballed, with the city now accounting for nearly a quarter of India’s more than 4,700 deaths and more a fifth of India’s over 165,000 infections.

Workers in cities in the age group of 18 to 25 years were already much less likely to be in formal jobs and more likely to be employed informally and paid less, wrote Shania Bhalotia, Swati Dhingra and Fjolla Kondirolli,

Read More

Four-day working week could create 500K new jobs in UK, study says



a man holding a sign: Photograph: Amer Ghazzal/Rex/Shutterstock


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Amer Ghazzal/Rex/Shutterstock

A four-day week in the public sector would create up to half a million new jobs and help limit the rise in unemployment expected over the coming months, according to research by the progressive thinktank Autonomy.

Amid concerns that the jobless total is set to rise sharply as the Treasury’s furlough scheme is wound down, the thinktank said the time was right for Rishi Sunak to pioneer a shorter working week.

The Autonomy study represents the first attempt to quantify the jobs impact of a four-day week, with the thinktank saying it would be possible for public sector workers to go on to a 32-hour week with no loss of pay.



A sign is seen outside a branch of Jobcentre Plus, a government run employment support and benefits agency, as the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, in London, Britain, August 6, 2020. REUTERS/Toby Melville


© Thomson Reuters
A sign is seen outside a branch of Jobcentre Plus, a government run employment support and benefits agency, as the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, in

Read More

Reasons to Study Actuarial Science and How to Become an Actuary

Someone intrigued by the prospect of assessing and managing risk may enjoy a career as an actuary, a business professional…

Someone intrigued by the prospect of assessing and managing risk may enjoy a career as an actuary, a business professional whose job involves consistently and accurately predicting the likelihood of misfortune in the midst of uncertainty and its potential financial cost.

What Actuarial Science Is and Why It Matters

“Actuarial science is about using math to assess what will happen next,” Amy Timmons — a Phoenix-based vice president, senior consultant and actuary with Segal, a consulting firm with U.S. and Canadian offices — explained in an email.

Stefanos Orfanos, a clinical assistant professor at the Georgia State University J. Mack Robinson College of Business and director of its undergraduate actuarial science program, provided a comprehensive definition of the term.

[Read: Actuary – Career Rankings, Salary, Reviews and Advice.]

“Actuarial

Read More