Public school funding would stay flat despite higher coronavirus costs under Murphy budget

While the 2020-21 school year will be an unprecedented one, the state will spend the same amount on K-12 schools as it did in 2019-20 school year, under Gov. Phil Murphy’s revised state budget proposal.

The $335 million spending increase for schools that was originally proposed during the budget address in February has been scrapped, the governor said Tuesday during his budget address at SHI Stadium at Rutgers University in Piscataway.

Under the reworked budget, school aid remains flat at $8.7 billion while continuing the phase-in of the updated school funding formula, the governor said.

The formula funding is part of Murphy’s $32.4 billion budget for the nine months beginning Oct. 1, including $4 billion in borrowing and $1 billion in new taxes.

In May, Murphy informed districts of the plan to slash the extra hundreds of millions in aid as the financial fallout of the coronavirus pandemic — including

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Fed’s Powell: rates to stay low for ‘however long it takes’

(Reuters) – Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell on Friday said the U.S. jobs report for August was “a good one,” but noted that with gains likely to slow, the central bank is planning to keep its foot on the monetary policy gas pedal for years.

FILE PHOTO: Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell, wearing a face mask, on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., June 30, 2020. Tasos Katopodis/Pool via REUTERS

“We do think it will get harder from here — because of those areas of the economy that are so directly affected by the pandemic still,” Powell told National Public Radio in an interview, referring particularly to sectors like leisure, hospitality, travel and entertainment that depend on large gatherings made unsafe by the virus.

Even as U.S. employers added 1.37 million jobs last month, the total number of jobs regained since the crisis has only been about half the total lost,

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Learning pods are here to stay and could disrupt American education

That is what Kendra Newton is doing: The 24-year-old first-grade teacher resigned from her job with Orange County Public Schools in Florida after learning she would have to teach in-person this fall. She is moving across the country to Oregon, where she will lead a pod of eight students — for a higher salary than she earned in Florida.

“It gave me a way to feel safe working,” Newton said. “I will have guaranteed money coming in, and a stable idea of what my life will be like, because there won’t be a school district changing its mind every two seconds. For my mental health, it’s just a better option.”

No reliable data exists on how many teachers have left, or are considering leaving, their jobs to teach pods. But worried school officials are sending emails claiming that pods pose just as much of a health risk as returning to

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