School funding falls far short of leveling the playing field for CT students

www.CtMirror.org

Smalley Academy in New Britain, where the overwhelming majority of students are Latino and Black students. The district is also one of the most underfunded districts in the state and lowest-achieving.

The state’s school funding formula is failing to bridge the divide between what rich and poor towns can afford to spend on educating their students. To close these yawning disparities, the state needs to spend anywhere from an additional $338 million to $1.7 billion more a year.

These are the conclusions of a trio of analyses on how the state funds its schools. Those studies – by the New England Public Policy Center, the School and State Finance Project, and the Rutgers Graduate School of Education – were provided to the CT Mirror this week.

The Federal Reserve Bank of Boston’s New England Public Policy Center pegged the annual cost of closing this gap at between $940 million

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Nabard to take up short term skill development programmes for reverse migrant workers



a close up of a book: Mandal said Nabard has already provided Rs 90,000 crore worth of long-term refinance to the banks for meeting credit requirement of the agriculture and allied sectors.


© Provided by The Financial Express
Mandal said Nabard has already provided Rs 90,000 crore worth of long-term refinance to the banks for meeting credit requirement of the agriculture and allied sectors.

National Bank for Agriculture And Rural Development (Nabard) will soon start a short-term skill development programme for reverse migrants that will help them to get re-employed at the earliest. The board has initially sanctioned programmes for Uttar Pradesh, Bihar and Jharkhand and seeks to work with the National Skill Development Corporation accredited national skill development centres.

CU Bhaskar, Nabard’s chief general manager in Mumbai told Financial Express the programme would be implemented on a large scale and majority of the funding would be done by Nabard. “But the entire process would be complicated since it would involve identifying efficient skill development centres and the real needy, who would require training to get back to work. The details of

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First Nations back-to-school COVID-19 funding falls far short, says AFN regional chief



a group of people sitting in a room: First Nations schools, like Sturgeon Lake Central School in Saskatchewan seen in 2018, will be receiving $112 million for COVID-19 back to school preparations, Ottawa announced Wednesday.


© Jason Warick/CBC
First Nations schools, like Sturgeon Lake Central School in Saskatchewan seen in 2018, will be receiving $112 million for COVID-19 back to school preparations, Ottawa announced Wednesday.

The $112 million for COVID-19 back-to-school preparations for First Nations that Ottawa announced on Wednesday falls far short of needs faced by communities, according to the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) regional chief responsible for education. 

Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations Chief Bobby Cameron, who is the AFN regional chief for Saskatchewan, said the over 630 First Nations across Canada need about $1 billion to fully prepare for the restart of classes amid the pandemic. 

“Obviously our expectations were much higher,” said Cameron, who holds the education portfolio.

“We should have received $1 billion or close to it and at least we would have a fighting chance to have our schools ready.”

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced the $112 million

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Florida’s Guardian program short $5 million for school security

The money was reallocated by the state of Florida as funding needs changed with COVID-19.

TAMPA, Fla. — After the 2018 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, state lawmakers allocated $67 million to make sure every school had armed security as part of the statewide Guardian program.

Money not spent the first year was carried over to 2020, but then came COVID-19, and unspent funds intended for future training and to keep the program running this year and beyond suddenly disappeared.

“It was on the governor’s veto list,” said Pinellas County Sheriff Bob Gualtieri, who chairs the Marjory Stoneman Douglas Public Safety Commission. “There was about $41.5 million dollars of the initial $67 million that was still sitting there on June 30 of this year and the state took that money back and, in essence, defunded the Guardian Program.”

So what does that mean for keeping school campuses safe

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