Self-control is a critical skill for kids!

PITTSBURGH, Pa. (Ivanhoe Newswire) — As parents, we feed our kids and make sure they get exercise to keep their bodies strong. We expose them to new experiences, so their minds grow. Science now shows that certain interactions between parents and children actually change the structure of their brains, improving their social and emotional skills into adulthood.

Many of the teens in the Allegheny Youth Development judo class signed up to practice basic self-defense.

“You move like this. Then you pin them to the mat,” explained Cymiar Woods.

Beyond training their bodies, these boys and girls are learning principles of self-control that give them a mental and emotional edge.

“When I get mad, I can calm down more,” shared Caeden Basking.

“When he has to focus and follow instructions, it helps him in school, too,” said Jackie Woods, Cymiar and Caeden’s grandmother.

Jamie Hanson, PhD, psychologist at University of Pittsburgh,

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Why self-control is a critical skill for kids to learn

As parents, we feed our kids and make sure they get exercise to keep their bodies strong. We expose them to new experiences so their minds grow.

Science now shows that certain interactions between parents and children actually change the structure of their brains, improving their social and emotional skills into adulthood.

Many of the teens in the Allegheny Youth Development judo class signed up to practice basic self-defense.

“You move like this. Then you pin them to the mat,” explained Cymiar Woods.

Beyond training their bodies, these boys and girls are learning principles of self-control that give them a mental and emotional edge.

“When I get mad, I can calm down more,” shared Caeden Basking.

“When he has to focus and follow instructions, it helps him in school, too,” said Jackie Woods, Cymiar and Caeden’s grandmother.

Jamie Hanson, a psychologist at the University of Pittsburgh, studies the brain to

Read More

Self-control is a critical skill for kids

PITTSBURGH, Pa. (WILX) –



a man sitting at a table using a laptop: Science now shows that certain interactions between parents and children actually change the structure of their brains, improving their social and emotional skills into adulthood.


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Science now shows that certain interactions between parents and children actually change the structure of their brains, improving their social and emotional skills into adulthood.

As parents we feed our kids and make sure they get exercise to keep their bodies strong. We expose them to new experiences so their minds grow. Science now shows that certain interactions between parents and children actually change the structure of their brains, improving their social and emotional skills into adulthood.

Many of the teens in the Allegheny Youth Development judo class signed up to practice basic self-defense.

“You move like this. Then you pin them to the mat,” explained Cymiar Woods.

Beyond training their bodies, these boys and girls are learning principles of self-control that give them a mental and emotional edge.

“When I get mad, I can calm down more,” said Caeden

Read More

Positive Parenting: Self-control: Critical skill for kids | Positive Parenting

PITTSBURGH, Pa. (Ivanhoe Newswire) — As parents we feed our kids and make sure they get exercise to keep their bodies strong. We expose them to new experiences so their minds grow. Science now shows that certain interactions between parents and children actually change the structure of their brains, improving their social and emotional skills into adulthood.

Many of the teens in the Allegheny Youth Development judo class signed up to practice basic self-defense.

“You move like this. Then you pin them to the mat,” explained Cymiar Woods.

Beyond training their bodies, these boys and girls are learning principles of self-control that give them a mental and emotional edge.

“When I get mad, I can calm down more,” shared Caeden Basking.

“When he has to focus and follow instructions, it helps him in school, too,” said Jackie Woods, Cymiar and Caeden’s grandmother.

Jamie Hanson, PhD, psychologist at University of Pittsburgh,

Read More

Self-Control: Critical skill for kids

PITTSBURGH, Pa. (Ivanhoe Newswire) — As parents we feed our kids and make sure they get exercise to keep their bodies strong. We expose them to new experiences so their minds grow. Science now shows that certain interactions between parents and children actually change the structure of their brains, improving their social and emotional skills into adulthood.

Many of the teens in the Allegheny Youth Development judo class signed up to practice basic self-defense.

“You move like this. Then you pin them to the mat,” explained Cymiar Woods.

Beyond training their bodies, these boys and girls are learning principles of self-control that give them a mental and emotional edge.

“When I get mad, I can calm down more,” shared Caeden Basking.

“When he has to focus and follow instructions, it helps him in school, too,” said Jackie Woods, Cymiar and Caeden’s grandmother.

Jamie Hanson, PhD, psychologist at University of Pittsburgh,

Read More