Optomi Significantly Reduces the Time and Expense of Hiring for Clients Seeking Technology Talent | News

ATLANTA, Sept. 9, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Optomi, the technology talent brand of Optomi Professional Services, is known for significantly improving the interview-to-hire ratio for clients through a skill-set-focused approach to recruiting. Discovering culturally aligned candidates who possess the skills necessary to excel in their roles is a strength of Optomi’s.

A typical employer seeking to hire for a position will review 250 resumes and conduct 6-8 first interviews with 2-3 rounds afterward before making an offer to a single candidate. Optomi takes the burden from the hiring manager by vetting candidates so effectively that the firm averages an interview-to-hire ratio of 3:1 versus the industry norm of 6:1 (or worse).

“A time-consuming hiring process eats up hiring managers’ bandwidth and causes delays that can affect the entire organization. Our highly-effective skill-set approach to recruiting talent coupled with our proven processes streamline the hiring and greatly improve the chances that

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Thai students seeking reforms debate education minister

Round 2 of a dialogue between Thailand’s education minister and high school students seeking radical reforms has taken place with a robust though mostly polite exchange of views but no resolution

BANGKOK — Round 2 of a dialogue between Thailand’s education minister and high school students seeking radical reforms took place Saturday, with a robust though mostly polite exchange of views but no resolution.

What had been billed by the students as a debate with Education Minister Nataphol Teepsuwan was a rare example of an open conversation between a senior politician and the younger generation that is not seen much in Thai society.

The students, who have dubbed their group Bad Students in self-mocking humor, are demanding an end to harassment for their activities, abolition of outmoded draconian regulations and total reform of the educational system.

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Seeking A Career In Science, Engineering Or Technology? Cultivate These 3 Key Skills

The global pandemic has brought a new level of realization to the nation’s scientists, technology workers and engineers. As the US turns to other countries for the production of vital materials (such as masks from China), Americans are wondering how we are going to go forward if we can’t get the stuff we need – and get it produced here in the United States. Before you can say, “global supply chain” and “lower wages in Asia”, consider the insights of materials management PhD and company co-founder, Brandon Sweeney. He says there’s a new way for engineers, tech workers and the companies they serve to create exceptional value, right here within the borders of the USA.

To be clear, this isn’t an article about the benefits of economic isolation or nationalism. Sweeney says that self-sufficiency is the goal –

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Huge fall in service sector jobs indicates more females seeking career change



a person sitting at a table using a laptop computer: SEEK data shows jobs in the consumer services sector are at 51.8 percent of pre-COVID levels.


© Getty.
SEEK data shows jobs in the consumer services sector are at 51.8 percent of pre-COVID levels.



a person sitting at a table using a laptop computer


© Provided by Newshub


A growing number of Kiwi job-seekers are considering a different career path in the wake of COVID-19.  

Research by online employment website SEEK of  4000 job-seekers in July showed one in three were rethinking their career as a result of COVID-19. Of those whose jobs were directly impacted, just under half (45 percent) wanted to move to an industry less impacted by the pandemic.

The data shows jobs in the consumer services sector have fallen the most, now at just over half of pre-COVID-19 levels. SEEK data from 2019 showed jobs in this sector attracted a higher number of female applicants than male.

“Prior to the latest restrictions, consumer services roles were at 58 percent when compared with pre-COVID levels, and now they’re down 6.2 percent to 51.8

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