Domino’s Pizza adding 5,000 UK jobs, pizza orders continue to rise

  • Domino’s Pizza is expanding its UK workforce by around 15%, with 5,000 new employees.
  • The pizza chain is also offering more than 1,000 six-month placements for unemployed young people, funded by the UK Government.
  • Papa John’s and Pizza Hut have also launched major recruitment drives during the pandemic, and demand for pizza continues to rise.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Domino’s Pizza has continued the hiring spree among pizza chains during the pandemic by adding 5,000 new jobs in the UK — a 15% expansion of its workforce.

The new roles, which include pizza chefs, customer service colleagues, and delivery drivers, will bring its total UK workforce from 35,000 to around 40,000, and will help the chain prepare for the holiday rush, it said.

Domino’s has already added 6,000 UK jobs since the start of the pandemic thanks to soaring sales: Like-for-like sales were up 4.8% in the

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Sales rise for VR Education’s remote learning tools

Virtual learning company VR Education has reported strong sales growth driven by its flagship online platform, Engage.

The Waterford-based firm said revenue in the first six months of 2020 reached €681,000. That is 37pc higher than a year ago.

Chief executive David Whelan said the world’s adoption of remote working amid the Covid-19 pandemic has proved “transformational for VR Education”. He described the firm’s outlook as “brighter than ever – in stark contrast to the difficulties many corporates are experiencing with restrictions and shutdowns”.

Earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation (Ebitda) registered a loss of €0.9m, the same as in 2019.

But analysts said VR Education is well positioned for strong second-half sales, particularly for Engage.

That online virtual learning and corporate training platform generated 33pc of sales in the first half of 2020, up from 18pc a year ago.

A desktop version of Engage was released in December

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Florida covid cases rise among school-age children but school-specific data is kept from public

Volunteers across Florida have set up their own school-related coronavirus dashboards, and one school district is using Facebook after the county health department was told to stop releasing information about cases tied to local schools.

Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) has pushed aggressively for schools to offer in-person classes, even when Florida was the hot spot of the nation, and threatened to withhold funding if districts did not allow students into classrooms by Aug. 31. In the state guidelines for reopening schools, officials did not recommend that coronavirus cases be disclosed school by school. In fact, the DeSantis administration ordered some districts, including Duval and Orange, to stop releasing school specific coronavirus information, citing privacy issues.

The state also left it up to districts to decide whether masks should be worn by students and staffers. Some require it, but many don’t.

Department of Health spokesman Alberto Moscoso said in an email

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Fearing virus, parents in Spain rise against back to school

BARCELONA, Spain — Ángela López hardly fits the profile of a rule-breaker. But the mother of a 7-year-old girl with respiratory problems has found herself among parents ready to challenge Spanish authorities on a blanket order to return to school.

They are wary of safety measures they see as ill-funded as a new wave of coronavirus infections sweeps the country. They fear sick students could infect relatives who are at higher risk of falling ill from COVID-19. And they claim that they have invested in computers and better network connections to prepare for online lessons, even preparing to homeschool their children if necessary.

Many of the defiant parents, including López, are also ready to stand up to the country’s rigid, one-size-fits-all rule of mandatory in-school education, even if that means facing charges for truancy, which in Spain can be punished with three to six months in prison.

Her daughter was

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Pay rise for teachers will halve school funding boost in England | School funding

School budgets will be less than 2% better off next year after it was revealed that the government’s pay increases for teachers will absorb more than half of the extra funding promised for state schools in England.

Analysis by the House of Commons library for the Liberal Democrat MP Layla Moran calculated that the pay award announced by the government last month would come entirely from school budgets, eating into the funding boost announced for 2020-21 onwards.

The extra billions for school funding promised in the pre-election spending round will shrink to just £1.7bn in 2020-21 after accounting for the pay rise. Compared with 2019-20, that means the school budget increase from the Department for Education (DfE) will slow from 5.1% to just 1.9% in real terms.

The Commons researchers said the funding figures also do not include the additional costs that schools face as a result of Covid-19, such

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Homeschooling: Coronavirus fears drive rise in unconventional approach

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  • Homeschooling is on the rise in the UK as uncertainties around the reopening of schools has left some parents feeling like they need to take matters into their own hands.
  • A recent poll found that 30% of UK parents were not planning to send their children back to school, of which 91% said they would continue with homeschooling for the foreseeable future.
  • Reasons for homeschooling vary, whether its fears that schools aren’t opening or because children find it easier to work from home.
  • Professional tutoring and homeschooling groups have also seen a rise in interest, with one group telling Business Insider that there’s been a “surge in demand” since March that has continued into September.
  • But while there’s an uptick in homeschooling interest, there is little guidance and support from the government.
  • Parents often feel anxious about the responsibilities of teaching their children.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.
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