Johnson & Johnson Seeks Female Researchers Working in Science, Technology, Engineering, Math, Manufacturing and Design

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J., Sept. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Johnson & Johnson today announced that it is accepting applications for its 2021 Women in STEM2D (WiSTEM2D) Scholars Award, aimed at supporting assistant or associate academic professors in the disciplines of Science, Technology, Engineering, Math, Manufacturing and Design. For three years, each recipient will receive mentorship from leaders at Johnson & Johnson and a total $150,000 ($50,000 each year). The deadline for applications is Oct. 15, 2020 at 9 a.m. HST, and guidelines and additional details are available here: https://www.jnj.com/wistem2d-university-scholars.

Launched in June 2017, the Johnson & Johnson WiSTEM2D Scholars Award aspires to fuel development of female STEM2D leaders, and inspire career paths in STEM2D, by supporting the research of the awarded women in their respective STEM2D fields.

Dr. Naama Geva-Zatorsky, one of the 2019 winners of the Johnson & Johnson WiSTEM2D Scholars Award, along with her team of researchers at

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Implications of powerful DNA-altering technology are too important to be left to scientists and politicians: researchers

Why plumbers and teachers should have a say on designer babies and genetically enhanced potatoes
Citizen assemblies are ideal for probing the complexities of genome editing. Credit: Alice Mollon

Designer babies, mutant mozzies and frankenfoods: These are the images that often spring to mind when people think of genome editing.


The practice, which alters an organism’s DNA in ways that could be inherited by subsequent generations, is both more complex and less dramatic than the popular tropes suggest.

However, its implications are so profound that a growing group of experts believe it is too important a matter to be left only to scientists, doctors and politicians.

Writing in the journal Science, 25 leading researchers from across the globe call for the creation of national and global citizens’ assemblies made up of lay-people to be tasked with considering the ethical and social impacts of this emerging science.

The authors come from a broad range of disciplines, including governance, law, bioethics, and genetics.

The immense potential,

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DVIDS – News – ERDC researchers participate in U.S. Army Foreign Technology (and Science) Assessment Support program


VICKSBURG, Miss. – Until engaging in conversation with colleagues while on temporary duty in the United Kingdom, Dr. Ahmad Tavakoly was not aware of the U.S. Army Foreign Technology (and Science) Assessment Support (FTAS) program. This summer, Tavakoly, a research civil engineer with the U.S. Army Engineer Research a Development Center’s (ERDC) Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory (CHL), and co-principal investigator Dr. Mark Wahl, also from CHL, completed the first ERDC project funded by the program.

FTAS creates opportunities for U.S. scientists and engineers to acquire and assess international technology. Researchers submit proposals, and the FTAS program provides the initial funds for subject-matter experts to perform technology assessments, basic research studies, as well as test and evaluation efforts of foreign research and technology that is deemed as unique, state-of-the-art, and has the potential to meet critical Army needs that are aligned with the Army’s modernization priorities for both the future

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Georgia State, Georgia Tech Join Technology and Social Science Researchers to Address Injustices – Georgia State University News

ATLANTA—Twenty Georgia State University and Georgia Institute of Technology faculty and graduate students, recently named Public Interest Technology – University Network (PIT-UN) Fellows, are now collaborating on interdisciplinary research projects designed to address historic social and racial inequality in the Southeast.

This PIT-UN program pairs faculty from commuting and the social sciences together to advance justice and improve public well-being via technology. The projects will address problems or challenges related to public health, criminal justice, housing displacement or disinvestment, and nonprofit organizations.

Susan M. Snyder and Scott Jacques, both of Georgia State’s Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, co-lead the fellowship program with Ellen Zegura of Georgia Tech, which administers the PIT-UN “Network Challenge” grant that funds it. The grant is the first of its kind awarded by PIT-UN, which is supported by the Ford Foundation, New America and the Hewlett Foundation.

“We are grateful to New America and the

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