After six months of remote learning, tech for students still a work in progress, limited by funding | Education

The shift to remote learning over a weekend in March meant Manchester had to make sure every student had a computer to use for schoolwork.

Six months later, it’s still a work in progress, said Stephen Cross, the school district’s chief information officer.

At the beginning of 2020, Manchester was a “two-to-one” district — two students to one computer, he said. Cross had replaced thousands of outdated laptops before the pandemic and has purchased thousands more, but some students are still waiting.

“We have 3,100 Chromebooks on order, and we have no idea when we’re going to get those,” he said. 

Some schools had a surplus of Chromebooks, so Cross engineered a way to loan some of those schools’ devices to other schools.

“That’s how we’ve been getting devices into the hands of families, moving things around,” Cross said. “We had to scrounge. It was ‘do whatever we can,’ to

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$85,000 Cleveland Foundation Grant Will Fund Virtual Internship Program Pilot To Teach Students Remote Workforce Skills

Lakeland Community College has received an $85,000 grant from the Cleveland Foundation to develop and pilot a unique virtual internship program.

With remote work capabilities now the norm for many people, the college wants to prepare its students entering today’s workforce with internship experiences that include the ability to do remote work.

Typically, students get their introduction to real-world work environments through on-site internships. But because of the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, many businesses closed their offices and shifted to remote work which resulted in no internship opportunities throughout the past months for students. Now that work-from-home has been implemented on such a large scale, employers are willing to explore how to best bring interns into the fold.

“We are very grateful for this Cleveland Foundation grant to help move our students’ education forward. Engaging students in experiential learning of all kinds is critical as they move from students

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Love working from home? Here are 20 of the best jobs and careers for being remote

The coronavirus has forced — or, maybe inspired? — us to judiciously reconsider everything from where we live to what we value most in our homes. Amid shutdowns and evolving safety guidelines, businesses have swiftly adopted new business models, selling subscription boxes and going virtual to stay connected with customers during These Unprecedented Times. We’ve also become more thoughtful neighbors and enthusiastic cheerleaders of our local businesses.

As we all try to understand and embrace “a new normal,” many of us are pondering a career change. Millions of Americans have been laid off since the start of the pandemic, thrusting them into job searches for the first time in years. For others, it may be the momentum of change and the quest for self-fulfillment that’s leading them to consider new options. Also? Many of us have simply become accustomed to working from home and don’t want to return to

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Child care providers step up for remote back-to-school as Kansas considers funding – News – The Topeka Capital-Journal

When back-to-school day was approaching, Victor Rodriguez decided his oldest child, who is registered with Whitson Elementary School in Topeka, was staying home.

“We’re not sending her to school like two days here and then online,” he said. “I decided they’re not going to school the whole year until we see what’s going on with this pandemic.”

But Rodriguez faced a dilemma: how to continue running his restaurant to pay the bills and how to take care of his three children, all 5 years old or younger, at the same time. It’s something he has juggled with since the pandemic hit.

“Having three children, it becomes very expensive to have a caretaker or day care. One is expensive already, but three multiples it,” Rodriguez said.

He came up with a solution. Last week, Rodriguez opened up California Kids Child Care to not only take care of his own children but

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WISD Continuing Efforts To Improve Remote Learning In County School Districts

The Washtenaw Intermediate School District is continuing to work with other local school districts to improve the remote learning experience for students throughout the county.

The WISD is coordinating efforts with the county’s school districts while continuing to seek out additional grant funding and additional training options for teachers.

The WISD’s Interim Superintendent, Naomi Norman, says geography remains an issue for many students trying to learn remotely.

“There are large areas of Washtenaw County where there is no broadband access, no high-speed internet, and even areas that don’t have cell phone access, so that continues to be a very big concern for us,” Norman says.

Norman says students enrolled in special education programs also face unique challenges, and the WISD is working with students and their families to ensure each of them is getting what they need to succeed.

Non-commercial, fact based reporting is made

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Sales rise for VR Education’s remote learning tools

Virtual learning company VR Education has reported strong sales growth driven by its flagship online platform, Engage.

The Waterford-based firm said revenue in the first six months of 2020 reached €681,000. That is 37pc higher than a year ago.

Chief executive David Whelan said the world’s adoption of remote working amid the Covid-19 pandemic has proved “transformational for VR Education”. He described the firm’s outlook as “brighter than ever – in stark contrast to the difficulties many corporates are experiencing with restrictions and shutdowns”.

Earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation (Ebitda) registered a loss of €0.9m, the same as in 2019.

But analysts said VR Education is well positioned for strong second-half sales, particularly for Engage.

That online virtual learning and corporate training platform generated 33pc of sales in the first half of 2020, up from 18pc a year ago.

A desktop version of Engage was released in December

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Remote learning isn’t just for kids. These Tucson classes will help you continue your own education. | tucson life

Even grown-ups long graduated can go back to school this fall. 

The University of Arizona and the local continuing education institution The Learning Curve are offering virtual classes that will teach you about everything from the history and production of chocolate to using music to navigate the pandemic. There are so many options. 

Even better? This isn’t your third-grader’s remote learning experience. There are no tests, no homework and no credit. You learn simply for the joy of it. 

“I think that we all benefit from continued learning,” says Susan Dick, the founder and director of The Learning Curve. “It’s good for our brains, and it’s good for our hearts to keep learning about a variety of topics and ways we can understand each other. People understand each other through arts, humanities, literature, music and history, and there has never been a more important time for us to do that.” 

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Manpower Group: Remote work, flexible hours and more opportunities to learn new skills will be lasting pandemic legacy for many

MILWAUKEE, Sept. 8, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The impact of the COVID-19 health, economic and social crisis continues to weigh heavily on the global labor market yet early signs of recovery are beginning to emerge according to the latest ManpowerGroup (NYSE: MAN) Employment Outlook Survey of over 38,000 employers in 43 countries conducted in July 2020.

Key findings:

  • Hiring intentions improve since last quarter in 37 of 43 countries though 41 decline year-over-year. Taiwan, the U.S., Turkey and Japan report the strongest Outlooks while Panama, Costa Rica, South Africa and Colombia report the weakest.
  • Employers believe labor market recovery will take longer than first anticipated: When asked in April 54% expected a return before April 2021, now down to 31%. 13% believe hiring will not return until after July 2021 and 18% believe there will be no return to normal (vs.13% when asked in April)
  • Not all furloughed workers
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Indigenous education strategy failing remote communities

Indigenous education strategy failing remote communities
A game of football being played on country. Credit: Wayne Quilliam

A policy of remote Indigenous students boarding ‘off country’ to advance their education opportunities is having the reverse effect.


The findings came in a major report, the first of its kind and led by Dr. Marnie O’Bryan and Dr. William Fogarty from the Center for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR) at The Australian National University (ANU), examined the educational outcomes of young people from a remote community in the Northern Territory over 10 years.

Worryingly, it found large numbers of high school students dropping out in their early teens, very low literacy levels, no high schools for them to attend and no educational alternatives.

The study found remote-living young people had no option but to leave home and attend boarding schools away from their communities for their secondary education.

The majority of students dropped out in years seven and

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Growing concerns that special education students are falling behind as classes go remote

Last
Updated Aug 21, 2020 7:43 PM EDT

With more schools set to open next Monday, some districts are scrambling to hire school nurses. Less than 40% of schools employed a full-time nurse before the coronavirus pandemic. There are also growing concerns for the seven million children who receive special education services.

Remote learning has been a tremendous challenge for 6-year-old Calvin Latham.

“This spring a lot of kids with disabilities didn’t soar in that environment,” said Toby Latham, Calvin’s father.

The rising first-grader from Virginia has a brain malformation, making him one of seven million children in the U.S. receiving special education services.

“He needs hand-over-hand support for writing exercises and the cutting and gluing and the basic things a first-grader would do,” said Latham.

Many special education students are legally guaranteed services, like an aide, through individualized education plans, or IEPs. But in a May survey, nearly

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