Jobs ‘crisis’ twice as bad as previous recession



A number of household names have announced redundancy plans since the pandemic began


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A number of household names have announced redundancy plans since the pandemic began

Employers in Britain are planning more than twice as many redundancies than they did at the height of the last recession, new figures show.

About 180,000 job cuts were planned from January to March 2009, while 380,000 were planned from May to July this year.

Completed redundancies could reach 735,000 this autumn, researchers say.

The figures were obtained by an Institute for Employment Studies (IES) Freedom of Information request.

Social distancing measures to prevent the spread of Covid-19 brought large parts of the UK economy to a standstill, forcing workers to stay at home, closing shops and bringing transport to a halt.

As a result, many businesses have been forced to consider reducing their workforces by making employees redundant.

Employers in England, Scotland and Wales must notify the Insolvency Service if they plan to

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Nova is the latest radio network to axe jobs amid COVID-19 recession



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Nova has axed at least four staff members in the latest round of job cuts to affect the radio industry during the COVID-19 recession.

On Tuesday, Radio Today confirmed that the network had decided to cut local workdays in Brisbane and Adelaide.

This change will see Nova 106.9 hosts Katie Mattin and Jack Tree, and Nova 919 announcers Rosie Panetta and Jarrod Walsh depart the business or ‘possibly be redeployed’.



a person posing for the camera: Job cuts: On Tuesday, Radio Today confirmed that Nova had decided to cut local workdays in Brisbane and Adelaide. Pictured: Nova hosts Kate Ritchie (who is not affected) and Jack Tree


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Job cuts: On Tuesday, Radio Today confirmed that Nova had decided to cut local workdays in Brisbane and Adelaide. Pictured: Nova hosts Kate Ritchie (who is not affected) and Jack Tree

The presenters were reportedly notified of the changes on Friday after their shifts.

In Sydney and Brisbane, Kent ‘Smallzy’ Small is now set to host afternoons, while Dan ‘DC’ Cassin will do mornings.



a dog sitting on a desk: Changes: In Sydney and Brisbane, Kent 'Smallzy' Small (pictured) is now set to host afternoons, while Dan 'DC' Cassin will do mornings


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5 financial issues schools will face due to the coronavirus-induced recession

The education sector was still feeling effects from the Great Recession when the coronavirus pandemic shuttered school buildings this spring, sending the country into economic shock — one that is expected to be much worse than the 2007-2009 recession. 

Prior to the pandemic, more than 20 states were spending less per K-12 pupil post-Great Recession, and in nine states, those expenditure levels were still declining. Across the nation, cuts to state education budgets made during the last recession are being linked to sizable and long-lasting losses in student achievement and outcomes. 

Here, we’ve gathered insights from experts and reports about what financial issues district leaders should watch out for as they navigate the 2020-21 school year.

Federal education aid

If the current recession follows in the footsteps of the last one, it will likely hit K-12 schools hardest where state revenues account for a larger portion of district budgets.

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