Princeton University Admitted Systemic Racism Is a Problem So the Department of Education Launched an Investigation

After Princeton University released a statement earlier this month acknowledging systemic racism is a problem on its campus, the Department of Education decided to launch an investigation into the school. Don’t worry though, this is totally not a way to punish a school for committing to be less racist.

According to NBC News, the university released a letter it received from Department of Education Assistant Secretary Robert King. The letter states that the university could be asked to return $75 million in federal funds awarded to the school in the seven years since current university President Christopher L. Eisgruber took office. King frequently took aim at Eisgruber’s statement pledging the university would do better when it comes to race.

“Based on its admitted racism, the U.S. Department of Education is concerned Princeton’s nondiscrimination and equal opportunity assurances in its Program Participation Agreements from at least 2013 to the present may

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Dept. of Education launches probe after Princeton president acknowledges systemic racism

The U.S. Department of Education has launched an investigation into Princeton University after its president acknowledged that systemic racism is “embedded” in the university’s structures.



a close up of a sign: Dept. of Education launches probe after Princeton president acknowledges systemic racism


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Dept. of Education launches probe after Princeton president acknowledges systemic racism

The department informed Princeton of the investigation in a letter Wednesday, citing Princeton University President Christopher Eisgruber’s open letter earlier this month discussing the school’s efforts to address systemic racism.

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Officials said the university “repeatedly represented and warranted to” the department that it was complying with nondiscrimination mandates under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, but asserted that Eisgruber in his letter had admitted the university is “racist.”

The Department of Education expressed concern that the university has received tens of millions of dollars in federal funds despite the potential lack of compliance.

“Based on its admitted racism, the U.S. Department of Education (‘Department’) is concerned

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Department of Education to investigate Princeton after president admits to ‘systemic racism’

The Department of Education announced it is investigating Princeton University after its president said racism is “embedded” at the Ivy League school and in society, according to a new report.

In an open letter published earlier this month, Princeton President Christopher L. Eisgruber outlined his plan to tackle “systemic racism” at the university and elsewhere.

“Racist assumptions from the past also remain embedded in structures of the University itself,” he wrote. “For example, Princeton inherits from earlier generations at least nine departments and programs organized around European languages and culture, but only a single, relatively small program in African studies.”

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If “racism and the damage it does to people of color persist at Princeton” as Eisgruber wrote, then the school may be violating a portion of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, according to a letter from

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Department of Education investigating Princeton after school acknowledges systemic racism

Federal authorities launched a sweeping probe of Princeton University after the Ivy League school acknowledged the role systemic racism has played on its campus, the school said Thursday.

The 274-year-old university published a letter from Department of Education Assistant Secretary Robert King saying that Princeton could be asked to return federal funds it has received — totaling $75 million since 2013 — when university President Christopher L. Eisgruber took office.

King focused on a Sept. 2 statement by Eisgruber announcing efforts Princeton would take to combat systemic racism.

“Based on its admitted racism, the U.S. Department of Education is concerned Princeton’s nondiscrimination and equal opportunity assurances in its Program Participation Agreements from at least 2013 to the present may have been false,” King wrote. “The Department is further concerned Princeton perhaps knew, or should have known, these assurances were false at the time they were made.”

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Education Department Investigates Princeton After University Admits to Systemic Racism | Education News

The White House has opened an investigation into Princeton University, accusing it of civil rights violations after its president admitted racism exists at the school.

Earlier this month, Princeton President Christopher Eisgruber published a letter to the university community in which he acknowledged that the university has and continues to be shaped by systemic racism.

“Racism and the damage it does to people of color nevertheless persist at Princeton as in our society, sometimes by conscious intention but more often through unexamined assumptions and stereotypes, ignorance or insensitivity, and the systemic legacy of past decisions and policies,” he wrote, underscoring also that for most of Princeton’s history, the university “intentionally and systematically excluded people of color, women, Jews, and other minorities.”

“Racist assumptions from the past also remain embedded in structures of the University itself,” he added, noting that, for example, Princeton has at least nine departments and programs organized

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Education Department investigates Princeton for admitting ‘systemic racism’ on campus

The Trump administration has opened an investigation into Princeton University over the school president’s recent statement that students there face “systematic racism” and that racism is “embedded” in the structures of the university.



a group of people in front of a brick building: Students walking along Princeton's campus.


© William Thomas Cain / Getty
Students walking along Princeton’s campus.

Education Department officials notified Princeton this week that they are examining whether the university’s “admitted racism” means that it made materially false statements when it for years assured the public and the federal government that it doesn’t discriminate based on race.

At issue is a message Princeton’s president, Christopher Eisgruber, wrote to the university earlier this month discussing efforts to combat “systemic racism” at the school, as well as examine decisions and policies that have excluded students of color and other marginalized groups.

“Racism and the damage it does to people of color nevertheless persist at Princeton as in our society, sometimes by conscious intention

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Education Department launches investigation after Princeton’s president confronts ‘systemic racism’ on campus

“On September 2, 2020, you admitted Princeton’s educational program is and for decades has been racist,” the Education Department stated in a letter to the university. It cited school President Christopher L. Eisgruber’s statements that racism and the damage it does to people of color persist at Princeton, and that racist assumptions remain embedded in the structures of the university.

Like many universities and other institutions across the country in a summer of racial reckoning, Princeton has been delving into its history and asking what changes it could make. The department’s letter comes at a politically fraught time, weeks before the election, when President Trump has moved to overhaul federal agencies’ racial sensitivity trainings and called for a “pro-American” curriculum in schools that “celebrates the truth about our nation’s great history.”

On Thursday, Trump said that U.S. schools are indoctrinating children with a left-wing agenda and that the result could

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Education Dept. Opens Investigation into Princeton after President Claims Racism ‘Embedded’ in University

National Review

Minneapolis City Council Members Complain of Rising Crime Months after Trying to Defund Police Department

Minneapolis City Council members complained of rising crime rates in the city and asked the city’s police chief what he is doing about it during a Tuesday meeting on police reform, months after the council proposed dismantling the police department.Council members told police chief Medaria Arradondo that their constituents have reported seeing and hearing street racing which sometimes results in crashes, daylight carjackings, robberies, assaults and shootings, according to an MPR News report.”Residents are asking, ‘Where are the police’?” said newly elected council member Jamal Osman who has been swamped by resident complaints that calls for police are going unanswered.“That is the only public safety option they have at the moment. MPD. They rely on MPD. And they are saying they are nowhere to be seen,” Osman said.In the aftermath of the police

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From prime minister to podcaster, Paul Martin speaks on racism, education and inequality

Former prime minister Paul Martin is trading in his diplomat’s hat for a set of headphones as a podcaster in a new series offered by the Conference Board of Canada. 

The series, called Bright Future, hears from senior-level executives from some of the country’s biggest institutions.

Martin’s episode is available today, and focuses on what he calls the living standards gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians. 

Those gaps became apparent when Martin was designing educational programs for high schoolers through his organization, the Martin Family Initiative. 

“There is a high school business course given in almost every provincial high school in the country, but it’s a high school business course given very much to non-Indigenous people based on non-Indigenous ways of life,” Martin said.

“So what we really said was, ‘wait a minute, the youngest and the fastest growing segment of our population are Indigenous. And they also want to

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SIUE School of Education, Health and Human Behavior Takes Aim at Institutionalized Racism by Hiring Faculty of Color

In one small way to combat a more than “400-year-pandemic” of institutionalized racism in the U.S., Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Education, Health and Human Behavior (SEHHB) Dean Robin Hughes, PhD, is working in a deliberate and calculated way to make her University better, stronger and more equitable by hiring a group of faculty members of color, known as cluster hires.

EDWARDSVILLE, Ill., Sept. 1, 2020 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — In one small way to combat a more than “400-year-pandemic” of institutionalized racism in the U.S., Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Education, Health and Human Behavior (SEHHB) Dean Robin Hughes, PhD, is working in a deliberate and calculated way to make her University better, stronger and more equitable by hiring a group of faculty members of color, known as cluster hires.

“I thought about a request for a cluster hire of faculty of color, when I learned about

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