Televising school sport could put too much focus on performance, a price too high for young athletes

A new deal to televise and live stream more secondary school sports in New Zealand has attracted significant attention and debate.

First XV secondary school rugby in New Zealand has been televised for some time on Sky Sport. The attraction of new revenue for broadcasters and other sporting organisations is clear, but what might the cost be for young athletes?

The new broadcast deal is a collaboration between the New Zealand Sport Collective (created by former Olympic rowing champion Rob Waddell and representing more than 50 sports) and Sky Sport Next, a YouTube channel run by Sky TV.

The deal evolved after consultation with several bodies including the New Zealand Secondary School Sports Council (NZSSSC), which coordinates secondary school sport.

It is easy to understand why some school students would like to be on television. But there are moral and ethical issues that need to be considered by those charged

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Drop in school enrollment could put millions in state funding at risk | State and Regional News

“Thirty-nine percent of our students did not have access to broadband before all this started,” he added. “So, there could be some students who we haven’t totally resolved that for.”

Graham, in Radford, said his staff have been following up with families who haven’t been attending classes with the school division, which is currently rotating in groups of students for face-to-face instruction several days a week. About 15 students moved out of the district before the start of the school year, but another 30 or 40 are currently homeschooling, he added.

Both he and White said part of the enrollment loss was linked to families who didn’t feel comfortable sending their children back to campus. But Graham also said multiple students have transferred to private schools in the area, many of which chose to fully reopen their campuses.

“Some families want their children to be 100 percent in-person, and private

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Price tag put on school project | Local News

The city’s combined elementary school construction project now has a price tag for taxpayers. 

If the residents of Gloucester approve the debt exclusion on Nov. 3, the city has projected that it will cost Gloucester homeowners $.20/$1,000 to cover the almost $40 million of expenses to combine East Gloucester and Veterans’ Memorial Elementary School. 

“We are trying to moderate what the impact is going to be on the tax rate,” said the city’s Chief Financial Officer John Dunn, noting that if a home was assessed at $500,000, the total increase of taxation would be $100 a year. 

The Massachusetts School Building Association has agreed to grant $26.9 million towards funding the construction project, which has a total estimated cost of $66.7 million. 

If the Nov. 3 vote goes in favor of the project, Gloucester taxpayers will see the city exceed the state’s Proposition 2 ½ tax cap for the time

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Melting Sculptures at Frost Museum of Science and Other Florida Locations Put State’s Climate Emergency in Spotlight

NBC 6 Chief Meteorologist John Morales to Moderate Virtual Town Hall, Webinars on Climate Crisis in September as part of Month-Long Series of CLEO Institute Events in Miami, Tampa and Orlando

One of artist Bob Partington’s melting wax sculptures

Can Florida’s swiftly rising temperatures actually melt a sculpture? It turns out they can, and in less time than you might think. The CLEO Institute has partnered with Miami ad agency Zubi and award-winning Los Angeles artist/inventor/director Bob Partington to show Floridians just how quickly. PHOTO/ 1stAveMachine, New York

Can Florida’s swiftly rising temperatures actually melt a sculpture? It turns out they can, and in less time than you might think. The CLEO Institute has partnered with Miami ad agency Zubi and award-winning Los Angeles artist/inventor/director Bob Partington to show Floridians just how quickly. PHOTO/ 1stAveMachine, New York

MIAMI, Sept. 03, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Can Florida’s swiftly rising temperatures

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