Planned Companies’ employees plan to walk off jobs at Hudson County luxury buildings

More than 100 workers plan to walk off their jobs at eight luxury high-rises in Hudson and Essex counties Thursday to protest their treatment during the pandemic and retaliation for organizing to join a union shop.

The Planned Companies’ employees — doorpersons, porter and handymen — have demanded hazard pay of $2 an hour and 14 extra paid sick days to be used for quarantine purposes during the coronavirus pandemic, officials with 32BJ of the Service Employees International Union said.

Union officials say Planned workers continue to be paid poverty wages as low as $11 an hour and many receive only 5 days of combined paid vacation and sick leave at 77 Hudson and The Cliffs and Gull’s Cove in Jersey City, Shipyard in Hoboken, Ambassador Towers and Washington Towers in East Orange, Xchange at Secaucus Junction in Secaucus and Galaxy Towers in Guttenberg.

The workers of Planned say a

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‘I never planned on homeschooling my kids:’ Milwaukee parents balance virtual schooling with full time jobs



a group of people standing in front of a store: Mikai Greer does virtual school with help from his brother, Kobe Matthews and his father, Sergio Greer.


© Submitted by Mia Greer
Mikai Greer does virtual school with help from his brother, Kobe Matthews and his father, Sergio Greer.

As pandemic parenting wears on, we’re taking on new roles we never planned on.

I never considered myself to be especially knowledgeable in public health, yet I now find myself keeping track of who my children’s close contacts are, and explaining to my daughters the difference between quarantine and isolation as I make sure they have a clean face mask as well as a backup every day before school.

Milwaukee mom Mia Greer and her husband, Sergio, never planned to be — nor wanted to be — homeschooling parents, but that’s how they would describe themselves these days. Greer works first shift, her husband works third shift, and between their work schedules, they balance the virtual schooling of their first grader, fifth grader and eighth grader.

Get daily

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Trump warns he’ll yank funding if California insists on leftist propaganda project planned for schools

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President Donald Trump indicated that the U.S. Department of Education may yank federal funding from public school systems that implement the 1619 Project curriculum.

In response to a tweet that California is incorporating the left-wing propaganda into its educational program, Trump responded that “Department of Education is looking at this. If so, they will not be funded!”

In the divisive and unreliable alternative journalistic take on American history that the New York Times created and then managed to spread far and wide, 1619 refers to the year that slaves first arrived in the colonies. The premise by the authors is that 1619, not 1776, was thus the year of America’s founding.

The controversial

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Struggling airlines lead U.S. planned job cuts in August: report

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. employers announced another 115,762 job cuts in August, led by struggling airlines as the COVID-19 pandemic weighs on travel and financial assistance from the government lapses.

Though the layoffs reported by global outplacement firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas on Thursday were 56% down from July, they lifted total job cuts so far this year to a record 1.963 million. The previous all-time annual high was 1.957 million in 2001. Companies announced 160,411 hiring intentions in August.

“The leading sector for job cuts last month was transportation, as airlines begin to make staffing decisions in the wake of decreased travel and uncertain federal intervention,” said Andrew Challenger, senior vice president at Challenger, Gray. “An increasing number of companies that initially had temporary job cuts or furloughs are now

making them permanent.”

The report followed news on Wednesday that private employers hired fewer workers than expected in August.

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Not all French schools will reopen Tuesday as planned, education minster says

French officials have retreated on plans to reopen all schools Tuesday as coronavirus infections spike in the nation.



a view of a city street: Not all French schools will reopen Tuesday as planned, education minster says


© Getty
Not all French schools will reopen Tuesday as planned, education minster says

Education Minister Jean-Michel Blanquer told the French Journal du Dimanche newspaper that some schools will stay closed Tuesday but emphasized this would apply to “as few as possible.”

The schools where reopening will proceed as planned are “being decided by a day-by-day analysis based on the health situation of each territory,” Blanquer said.

His comment comes the day after a group of French doctors published an open letter calling for stricter anti-virus measures in school, including combination online and in-person instruction and masks for children as young as six, according to The Associated Press.

Under current plans, French schools are set to fully reopen with masks required for students 11 and up. The precautions are less stringent than

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