Nuclear power plants promising thousands of UK jobs will not go ahead



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Nuclear power plants promising thousands of UK jobs will not go ahead after Japanese giant Hitachi pulled out of the scheme.

The decision not to go ahead with building new power stations at Wylfa Newydd on Anglesey and at Oldbury on Severn, in South Gloucestershire, deals a huge blow to the nuclear industry and hopes of creating thousands of new jobs.

Hitachi announced it will end business operations on the nuclear power plant construction project at Wylfa, which was suspended in January 2019.

A statement said: ‘Hitachi made this decision given that 20 months have passed since the suspension, and the investment environment has become increasingly severe due to the impact of Covid-19.’



An artist's impression of the planned nuclear power station at Wylfa on Anglesey in north Wales. Horizon said it will be ceasing its activities to develop two projects in the UK


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An artist’s impression of the planned nuclear power station at Wylfa on Anglesey in north Wales. Horizon said it will be ceasing its activities to

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National Science Foundation, Ohio Department of Higher Education Ohio Action Fund award UD chemists $290K for nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer : University of Dayton, Ohio

By Dave Larsen

The National Science Foundation awarded University of Dayton chemists Jeremy Erb and Vladimir Benin $240,379 and the Ohio Department of Higher Education Ohio Action Fund provided an additional $50,233 for the purchase of a Bruker 400 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer to support faculty research and student research training in chemistry and the biological sciences.

The National Science Foundation (NSF) award is supported by the agency’s Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) and Chemistry Research Instrumentation programs. It represents Erb’s first federal sponsored research grant and the first NSF MRI award for the College of Arts and Sciences.

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy allows scientists to determine the chemical structure of a compound by bombarding molecules with radio waves while under the influence of a magnetic field. The new instrument will replace the Department of Chemistry’s outdated model, and provide state-of-the-art technology to enhance faculty research capabilities and expand

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