Trump administration threatens to pull millions in school funding over transgender students / LGBTQ Nation

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Donald Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVosPhoto: Shutterstock

Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos is reportedly threatening to pull $18 million in diversity funding from Connecticut schools that refuse to withdraw from the state’s athletic conference that allows transgender students athletes to compete.

The Office for Civil Rights at the Department of Education is threatening to withhold the diversity money from three districts in the state that is intended to help schools desegregate. The schools are members of the Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference (CIAC), the organization that runs school sports in the state.

Related: This transgender teen athlete is a rising star & an inspiration

The CIAC is currently being sued by three cisgender students with help from the SPLC designated hate group Alliance Defending Freedom because transgender girls are allowed to compete with their gender in that state. The Department of Education, under Trump, has been supportive of the

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Local schools could lose millions under current funding formula

Johnson County schools could lose millions of dollars if virtual students aren’t fully funded by the state.

As it stands, starting in January, virtual students will be funded at just 85% of the rate of an in-school student if that student attends school in-person less than half the time.

Gov. Eric Holcomb earlier this month said he would ask the Indiana State Board of Education to call a special meeting to delay the fall count of student enrollment, known as the Average Daily Membership, through at least December. That count is used to set new funding levels for schools.

Center Grove schools, the county’s largest district, stands to lose the most of any Johnson County school district if the current funding formula is used. The district shifted from full-time in-person learning at its high school and two middle schools this week after the school district reported 316 COVID-19-related student absences,

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Daktronics to cut 100 jobs, net sales fall millions behind in Q1 for South Dakota-based company

South Dakota-based Daktronics is cutting about 100 jobs as the company anticipates financial setbacks created by the coronavirus pandemic, according to a Friday statement from the company.

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The Brookings-based maker of electronic displays and billboards reported its net sales, net income and cash generated by operations for the quarter were all down millions of dollars year-over-year, according to financials released last week.

Daktronics was able to remain profitable in the short-term, but that was with temporary measures, spokeswoman Staci Mergenthal said in an emailed statement.

“We now foresee a more prolonged downturn and we felt a longer-term solution was necessary,” Mergenthal said.

Financial strain hasn’t stopped Daktronics from landing some sizable contracts, including installing a suite of video displays on a Major League Soccer stadium planned for Austin, Texas.

But even with work on the Austin stadium, Daktronics still reported decreasing sales for the first quarter of its

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New York withholds millions in funding as schools struggle with reopening | Govt-and-politics

Robert Lowry, deputy director of the New York State Council of School Superintendents, said Wednesday that payments to schools during the quieter summer months amount to about $1 billion. Over the full school year, it will end up totaling about $27 billion – and the big flow of cash from Albany to the districts is set to come at the end of September.

Still, the recent drip, drip, drip of cuts so far from Albany are, Lowry said, “alarming as an indication of what could be in store for schools.”

Further, schools don’t know if the cuts so far will be temporary or permanent. They also don’t know if the cuts will be made across-the-board, which could have far more devastating impacts on less wealthy and poorer school districts in urban and rural areas, or be done on some kind of wealth-based need formula.

Lowry said school superintendents and other

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