New national research and training hub at UW-Madison could transform medicine

A national research initiative announced today will place the University of Wisconsin-Madison at the forefront of a revolution in imaging fostered by cryo-electron microscopy and cryo-electron tomography – technologies that can illuminate life at the atomic scale.

The National Institutes of Health will provide $22.7 million over six years to create a national research and training hub at UW-Madison that will give scientists across the country access to this game-changing technology.

Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM for short) is a method used to make images of biological molecules that are flash-frozen to capture them in their native state. No dyes or other alterations are needed to view the structures, which gives scientists a highly accurate picture of true biological function. Scientists can peer into the very surfaces where drugs and proteins interact, where diseases occur, and where viruses orchestrate their attacks. Cryo-EM has the

Read More

IU School of Medicine and partners receive funding to deploy collaborative dementia care model

Supported by a $1.3 million grant from the U.S. Administration for Community Living, Department of Health and Human Services, Indiana University School of Medicine and its partners have launched a 36-month venture to enhance, strengthen and expand supports for people with Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias (ADRD) and their caregivers in 34 Indiana counties.

Managed by the IU Center for Health Innovation and Implementation Science, the goal of the Alzheimer’s Disease Programs Initiative (ADPI) is to build upon existing home and community-based social supports to maximize the ability of people with ADRD to remain independent in their communities, said project director Steven R. Counsell, MD, who is a professor of medicine at IU School of Medicine and medical director for the Division of Aging in the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration.

The ADPI is a collaboration between IU School of Medicine;

Read More

Online Originals: Brody School of Medicine allocates funding toward developing improved COVID-19 treatments, advancing vaccine research

GREENVILLE, N.C. (WNCT) – The Brody School of Medicine has received $15 million in CARES Act funding from the North Carolina General Assembly to put toward COVID-19 initiatives.

It allocated the funding toward more than 20 different projects to help develop improved treatments, advance vaccine research, and minimize COVID-19’s impact in the region and state.

“We think about this as an emerging disease but in NC now there are about 180 thousand people who had it and in a typical year we get about 50 thousand people with diabetes, so this is going to approach 4 times the annual diabetes diagnosis.”  Dr. Peter Schmidt, Vice Dean Brody School of Medicine 

The funded projects fall into three categories related to COVID-19:

  • Treatments to enhance innate immunity to the virus.
  • Vaccine development and community testing initiatives.
  • Other funded projects aim to support high-risk and rural populations in the region and advance efforts
Read More