Help for mid-career job seekers to move into biomedical roles, Manpower News & Top Stories

More help will be given to local mid-career job seekers to move into new roles in Singapore’s biomedical science sector, even as the nation continues to position itself as a regional hub to draw in investments and jobs in this area.

For example, some 300 professionals, managers, executives and technicians (PMETs) are expected to benefit from an 18-month professional conversion programme launched yesterday to prepare them for jobs in this sector, which has remained a bright spot amid the recession-hit economy. These include roles such as biotechnologists, production engineers and process development engineers.

And even as Singapore looks to building up a skilled workforce in the biomedical science industry, Trade and Industry Minister Chan Chun Sing said yesterday that efforts are also under way to anchor this sector here, to create new opportunities for businesses.

The Republic will not compete with others based on the cost of its labour and

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Manpower Group: Remote work, flexible hours and more opportunities to learn new skills will be lasting pandemic legacy for many

MILWAUKEE, Sept. 8, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The impact of the COVID-19 health, economic and social crisis continues to weigh heavily on the global labor market yet early signs of recovery are beginning to emerge according to the latest ManpowerGroup (NYSE: MAN) Employment Outlook Survey of over 38,000 employers in 43 countries conducted in July 2020.

Key findings:

  • Hiring intentions improve since last quarter in 37 of 43 countries though 41 decline year-over-year. Taiwan, the U.S., Turkey and Japan report the strongest Outlooks while Panama, Costa Rica, South Africa and Colombia report the weakest.
  • Employers believe labor market recovery will take longer than first anticipated: When asked in April 54% expected a return before April 2021, now down to 31%. 13% believe hiring will not return until after July 2021 and 18% believe there will be no return to normal (vs.13% when asked in April)
  • Not all furloughed workers
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