COVID-19 laid bare the inequities in Higher Education. Now, we risk losing an entire generation

When COVID-19 peaked in the Northeast, my home state of New Jersey moved into lockdown, including remote instruction for the state college and university systems. This educational shift, the virus’s disproportionate impact on Black and brown communities, and economic dislocation have had enormous impacts on the aspirations of students from low-income families who seek the transformational power of higher education.

For many families living below the poverty line in New Jersey and across the country, public universities and community colleges offer opportunity: to be the first in the family to receive a college education and to take a step up the ladder of social mobility. Today, one-fifth of college students nationally come from low-income backgrounds, and more than half are first-generation students — many of whom rely on public education institutions to transform their lives and the lives of their families. Even as economic mobility has decreased in the

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Americans are again growing concerned about losing their jobs: NY Fed

Americans are again fearful of losing their jobs, according to a survey from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York released Monday.

For the month of August, the average respondent in the New York Fed’s survey of consumer expectations said there was an 18.0% chance of losing their job in the next 12 months. That figure is a noticeable increase from the 16.0% chance reported in July and marks the second consecutive month of job loss concerns rising.

The New York Fed said worries over becoming unemployed were more pronounced among those without a college degree (21.3% perceived chance) and those with a household income below $50,000 a year (24.9% perceived chance).

People line up outside a Kentucky Career Center hoping to find assistance with their unemployment claim in Frankfort, Kentucky, U.S. June 18, 2020. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

The trend marks a reversal of labor market optimism over the course

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Are Singaporean workers really losing jobs to Indian expats due to Ceca free-trade deal?



a group of people jumping in the air: Office workers in Singapore. Photo: Reuters


Office workers in Singapore. Photo: Reuters

As Singapore’s economy slows amid the coronavirus pandemic and job losses mount, people’s anxieties over their livelihoods have found a convenient target: a free-trade agreement Singapore signed with India in 2005. On social media, the Comprehensive Economic Cooperation Agreement (Ceca) is being blamed for willy-nilly letting Indian nationals into Singapore to steal jobs from locals – no matter how many times the government says it is not true.

On a Facebook post of a news article explaining that Ceca did not give Indians automatic access to citizenship, permanent residency or employment, Stephanie Low commented: “Our jobs are taken by Ceca! Wait till the ministers’ jobs are also taken by them, then they will know!”

Others, like Emran Rahman, disparagingly referred to Indians as Ceca, saying: “Everywhere CECA! Even housing estates have them around!”

On the public group SG Opposition, Michael da Silva said

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Sales tax revenue may save Blount County Schools from losing state funding | News

Sales tax revenue coming in higher than projected this spring may save Blount County Schools from losing nearly $5 million a month in state funding starting in October.

BCS plans to ask the County Commission to approve a change this month to the general purpose school budget that wouldn’t alter the amount the district spends but would change the source of money.

The district planned to use more than $1 million from its undesignated fund balance for costs related to COVID-19. The budget amendment would rely on $580,000 of that coming from an increased sales tax revenue estimate instead.

Local funding rule

Without that infusion of area revenue, BCS would fail a “maintenance of effort” (MOE) requirement from the state, which is designed to keep local governments from cutting education spending.

Area revenue in the BCS general purpose budget totaled $42.58 million for the 2019-20 school year. However that was

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Evraz Regina union says it’s losing jobs while projects are given to out-of-country companies



Evraz says it has laid off 219 people since May.


© Olivia Stefanovich/CBC
Evraz says it has laid off 219 people since May.

The president of United Steelworkers (USW) Local 5890 says Evraz Regina could lose up to 500 jobs while out-of-province projects are importing steel for a pipeline from outside of Canada.

It announced on Friday that TC Energy, a pipeline company based in Calgary, had decided to import steel from outside of Canada for its 2021 NOVA Gas Transmission Ltd. (NGTL) expansion project.

Mike Day is the president of USW Local 5890, which is the union associated with Evraz in Regina.

He said Evraz — the largest steel company in western Canada — spoke with TC Energy last Tuesday and they were informed the job had been given to an out-of-Canada company while jobs are being lost in Saskatchewan.

“Right now, they’re only predicting that we’re going to only have roughly about 15 people working in [Evraz] come

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Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas losing construction jobs, despite housing boom

Home sales have been setting records in North Texas and statewide, rebounding sharply from the pandemic shutdown in late spring, and many builders are reporting big backlogs.



Nonresidential construction, such as this tower in Plano, is continuing when the projects have begun and their financing is lined up, industry officials said. But many new commercial office developments are being paused or canceled amid concerns about the coronavirus permanently changing the workplace.


© Lynda M. Gonzalez/Staff Photographer/The Dallas Morning News/TNS
Nonresidential construction, such as this tower in Plano, is continuing when the projects have begun and their financing is lined up, industry officials said. But many new commercial office developments are being paused or canceled amid concerns about the coronavirus permanently changing the workplace.

Despite the green shoots, construction jobs fell in July for both Dallas-Fort Worth and Texas while rising slightly nationwide. The U.S. also has held up better than Texas in retaining construction jobs over the past year and since February, before the pandemic effects started taking hold.

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From June to July, D-FW lost 2,100 jobs at specialty contractors and Texas lost 6,300 at construction firms, according to the U.S. Bureau

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