For Kansas schools, challenge will be ensuring special education students aren’t left behind – News – The Topeka Capital-Journal

It’s one challenge to close any learning gaps for special education students, but in a pandemic, just measuring those gaps will be another obstacle for Kansas schools, two special education leaders told The Topeka Capital-Journal.

Bert Moore, director of special education and title services for the Kansas Department of Education, and Heith Peine, executive director of student support services for Wichita Public Schools, joined The Capital-Journal’s Teaching Topeka podcast to discuss how special education teachers across Kansas have adapted to teaching in a pandemic.

State Commissioner of Education Randy Watson on Tuesday told the Kansas State Board of Education that, after a tour of just a few western Kansas school districts, he was becoming increasingly concerned that certain student groups, including special education students, are showing signs of academic regression as schools adjust their operations for the pandemic. More than 76,000 students, or 14.7% of all Kansas students, receive special

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Trump Calls for ‘Patriotic Education’ to Defend American History From the Left

“I think Donald Trump sees the cultural wars as a pathway to victory,” Mr. Brinkley added. But, he said, “what he sees as a cultural war is just trying to open up the narrative to other peoples’ experiences — not just white males.”

Mr. Trump gave his remarks a campaign twist when he promised to include a statue of Caesar Rodney, who rode 70 miles to Philadelphia in 1776 to cast a tiebreaking vote to declare independence, in a national statuary garden to honor “American heroes” whose creation he ordered in July. Mr. Biden, he charged, “said nothing as to his home state’s history and the fact that it was dismantled and dismembered.

“And a founding father’s statue was removed,” the president added.

Denouncing “propaganda tracts” that “try to make students ashamed of their own history,” Mr. Trump singled out The New York Times Magazine’s 1619 Project, named for the

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Implications of powerful DNA-altering technology are too important to be left to scientists and politicians: researchers

Why plumbers and teachers should have a say on designer babies and genetically enhanced potatoes
Citizen assemblies are ideal for probing the complexities of genome editing. Credit: Alice Mollon

Designer babies, mutant mozzies and frankenfoods: These are the images that often spring to mind when people think of genome editing.


The practice, which alters an organism’s DNA in ways that could be inherited by subsequent generations, is both more complex and less dramatic than the popular tropes suggest.

However, its implications are so profound that a growing group of experts believe it is too important a matter to be left only to scientists, doctors and politicians.

Writing in the journal Science, 25 leading researchers from across the globe call for the creation of national and global citizens’ assemblies made up of lay-people to be tasked with considering the ethical and social impacts of this emerging science.

The authors come from a broad range of disciplines, including governance, law, bioethics, and genetics.

The immense potential,

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How higher education’s own choices left it vulnerable to the pandemic crisis

This article was produced by a partnership of NBCNews.com and The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education.

When Missouri Western State University declared a financial emergency in the spring, it was widely assumed to have been the fault of the coronavirus pandemic.

But that was only part of the problem.

In the decade since the last recession, Missouri Western had kept hiring, increasing the number of full-time faculty by 5 percent as its undergraduate enrollment was plummeting by nearly 25 percent. Other spending, too, continued to go up. The university overspent its budget by millions of dollars in each of the last five years. Cash reserves sank.

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Some members of the institution’s own governing board were surprised when they were confronted with these facts. By then, the president who had overseen that spending had retired.

“The problem

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India’s Gen Z Risks Getting Left Out of Formal Jobs, Study Says

(Bloomberg) — India has been struggling with an unemployment problem and the coronavirus pandemic is making it even more difficult for its youngest workers to earn a decent living, shows an analysis by the London School of Economics.



a river running through a city: A pedestrian wearing a face mask crosses an empty road near the Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Terminus (CSMT) during a lockdown imposed due to the coronavirus in Mumbai, India, on Monday, June 1, 2020. Despite a strict two-month-long lockdown, the outbreak in India’s financial capital has snowballed, with the city now accounting for nearly a quarter of India’s more than 4,700 deaths and more a fifth of India’s over 165,000 infections.


© Bloomberg
A pedestrian wearing a face mask crosses an empty road near the Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Terminus (CSMT) during a lockdown imposed due to the coronavirus in Mumbai, India, on Monday, June 1, 2020. Despite a strict two-month-long lockdown, the outbreak in India’s financial capital has snowballed, with the city now accounting for nearly a quarter of India’s more than 4,700 deaths and more a fifth of India’s over 165,000 infections.

Workers in cities in the age group of 18 to 25 years were already much less likely to be in formal jobs and more likely to be employed informally and paid less, wrote Shania Bhalotia, Swati Dhingra and Fjolla Kondirolli,

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