Edtorial: Remember charter school reform? It’s more important than ever | Opinion

Remember charter school reform?

Before March and the public education turmoil caused by the coronavirus, the call for charter school funding reform was being echoed loudly in local school board meetings throughout the region at the start of 2020.

Several local boards considered and adopted a resolution circulated by the Pennsylvania School Boards Association supporting a charter reform proposal put forth by Gov. Tom Wolf. In January, more than 30 superintendents from districts in five counties formed a coalition, the Leaders for Educational Accountability and Reform Network, targeting legislative action on reform.

LEARN is comprised of “school leaders who are standing up for public education and fighting for charter school reform,” said Frank Gallagher, superintendent of Souderton Area School District, during a January press conference  in Montgomery County.

The superintendents’ initiative included visits to Harrisburg to lobby for the reform package. Even in early spring at the same time boards

Read More

Implications of powerful DNA-altering technology are too important to be left to scientists and politicians: researchers

Why plumbers and teachers should have a say on designer babies and genetically enhanced potatoes
Citizen assemblies are ideal for probing the complexities of genome editing. Credit: Alice Mollon

Designer babies, mutant mozzies and frankenfoods: These are the images that often spring to mind when people think of genome editing.


The practice, which alters an organism’s DNA in ways that could be inherited by subsequent generations, is both more complex and less dramatic than the popular tropes suggest.

However, its implications are so profound that a growing group of experts believe it is too important a matter to be left only to scientists, doctors and politicians.

Writing in the journal Science, 25 leading researchers from across the globe call for the creation of national and global citizens’ assemblies made up of lay-people to be tasked with considering the ethical and social impacts of this emerging science.

The authors come from a broad range of disciplines, including governance, law, bioethics, and genetics.

The immense potential,

Read More

Don’t let reopening debates distract from what’s most important in education: Parents

Stakeholders are fighting over what’s going to be best for children and their education this fall, whether it’s home-schooling pods, normal classrooms, online schooling, or something else. But these conversations ignore what’s most important: Empowering parents or guardians and getting them engaged.



a person standing in front of a building


© Provided by Washington Examiner


Rather than any particular education model, research shows students need relationships, positive parental or guardian relationships, in particular, to develop well. No matter which educational option families choose, studies show that positive parental involvement drives student success academically, physically, and socially. Luckily, these relationships can happen no matter the educational setting. In fact, when given options, parents tend to be more actively involved in their child’s learning.

Loading...

Load Error

Parents who listen and provide support and guidance, as opposed to those who rely solely on schools, raise well-adjusted children. Parents should make their involvement apparent because students succeed when they feel their parents

Read More

Digital Skills Are Critically Important to the Future Success of Tradespeople

Conference Board of Canada releases study on digitization of the skilled trades  

OTTAWA, Sept. 15, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The Conference Board of Canada, in partnership with the Future Skills Centre (FSC), has released a new impact paper on ways to advance digital skills among Canada’s apprentices and journeypersons.

“Bridging Generational Divides: Advancing Digital Skills in Canada’s Apprenticeships and Skilled Trades Ecosystem” explores the critical skill requirements of tradespeople as they adapt to the future of work.

Currently, generational differences between younger and older workers, such as communication preferences, are hampering the adoption of digital skills. Challenges related to time, cost, geography, outdated training curricula and technology, and limited Internet access are also proving to be barriers to digital skills development among Canada’s tradespeople.

“Tradespeople young and old need to learn seven core digital skills in order to adapt and thrive in a rapidly changing work environment,” says Andrew Bieler,

Read More