White House coronavirus task force focuses on higher education in state reports | News Headlines

(CNN) — The White House coronavirus task force placed a sharper focus on colleges and universities in its recommendations to states this week, pushing states to take measures to prevent further outbreaks as the school year begins.

CNN reached out to all 50 states for their weekly task force reports, which the White House has declined to make public, and obtained responses from 13 states as of Friday morning. Alabama was the only state to explicitly decline to provide its report. Other states referred CNN to other sources or did not respond.

This week’s set of reports, sent to states Tuesday evening, was directed to governors and their senior staff, as well as health officials, emergency managers, epidemiologists, lab directors and preparedness directors for each state.

The reports are individually tailored to each state with information on cases and test positivity and county-specific data and broadly show concern about spread

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COVID-19 laid bare the inequities in Higher Education. Now, we risk losing an entire generation

When COVID-19 peaked in the Northeast, my home state of New Jersey moved into lockdown, including remote instruction for the state college and university systems. This educational shift, the virus’s disproportionate impact on Black and brown communities, and economic dislocation have had enormous impacts on the aspirations of students from low-income families who seek the transformational power of higher education.

For many families living below the poverty line in New Jersey and across the country, public universities and community colleges offer opportunity: to be the first in the family to receive a college education and to take a step up the ladder of social mobility. Today, one-fifth of college students nationally come from low-income backgrounds, and more than half are first-generation students — many of whom rely on public education institutions to transform their lives and the lives of their families. Even as economic mobility has decreased in the

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Increased Use Of Tech In Higher Education During Covid-19 Exemplifies True Grit

The business world teems with buzzwords. Buzzwords reach epic heights, then tragically die after rampant overuse. Grit is one word that ebbs and flows in popularity, but, by all appearances, has yet to be marked with the scarlet b and remains a respected word that signifies a propensity for success.

American psychologist Angela Lee Duckworth took the term grit to new heights in her 2013 TED Talk titled Grit: The power of passion and perseverance where she shared her five characteristics of grit.

At a time where opinions on today’s hybrid learning delivery methods are nothing short of loudly divided, beyond the hysteria our fall 2020 higher education experience exudes true grit of those on the education delivery front lines.

It is easy to show how Duckworth’s 5

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Share Of Positive COVID-19 Cases As Texas Reopened Was Higher Than Originally Reported, New State Calculations Show



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By Shawn Mulcahy, The Texas Tribune Sept. 16, 2020

State health officials published new data this week that showed the state’s coronavirus positivity rate was higher in the spring than originally disclosed, even as public officials cited the data to justify business reopenings during the pandemic.

The Department of State Health Services announced a new method Monday for calculating the positivity rate, or the proportion of positive tests, and conceded that the previous method obscured the extent of viral transmission by combining old and new cases. The new formula relies on the date a coronavirus test was administered, rather than the date it was reported to health officials and verified as a case.

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As Texas prepared for the first phase of reopening in late April, Gov. Greg Abbott repeatedly pointed to the state’s positivity rate, even as the number of new cases and deaths

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Why Higher Education Needs To Think Customer Service To Ensure Student Success

With some colleges opening their doors to students, others opting for virtual learning, and some embracing a hybrid model, students are left under a cloud of uncertainty about their college experience. Now more than ever, as guidelines and decisions continue to change, excellent communication from colleges is essential to ensuring student success. Professors are no longer the only ones communicating with students, and they need clear and timely communication on safety, new procedures, payments, course selection and more. That is why higher education institutions must rethink the way they communicate, and provide the same level of top-notch customer service that parents and students expect from a host of other industries.

Colleges and universities are taking definitive action to attract and retain students, but these efforts have been further complicated by the constraints of the pandemic. In addition, bureaucracy and long hold times have historically

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How to Save Higher Education

There has never been a crisis in American higher education like the one we are facing today. While fall enrollment numbers are still in flux as colleges scramble to deal with an out-of-control pandemic, there is no question that all but the wealthiest institutions are facing deep financial pain and potential catastrophe. Even relatively conservative estimates like those published by the college financial planning firm Edmit suggest that, thanks to declining revenue and investment returns, one-third of all private colleges are now on track to run out of money within six years—a nearly 50 percent increase in estimates from 2019—and many are vulnerable to bankruptcy much sooner. Public universities, meanwhile, are about to be hammered by steep cuts in government funding, forcing them to raise prices, cut services, and turn away students, including millions of newly unemployed workers. 

Check out the complete 2020 Washington Monthly rankings here.

The

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COVID-19 Recovery Analysis: Alternative Credentials Market For Higher Education|Widening Skills Gap to boost the Market Growth | Technavio – Press Release

LONDON–(Business Wire)–Technavio has been monitoring the alternative credentials market for higher education and it is poised to grow by $ 1.18 bn during 2020-2024, progressing at a CAGR of over 17% during the forecast period. The report offers an up-to-date analysis regarding the current market scenario, latest trends and drivers, and the overall market environment.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20200916005079/en/

Technavio has announced its latest market research report titled Global Alternative Credentials Market for Higher Education 2020-2024 (Graphic: Business Wire)

Although the COVID-19 pandemic continues to transform the growth of various industries, the immediate impact of the outbreak is varied. While a few industries will register a drop in demand, numerous others will continue to remain unscathed and show promising growth opportunities. Technavio’s in-depth research has all your needs covered as our research reports include all foreseeable market scenarios, including pre- & post-COVID-19 analysis.

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Betsy DeVos Weakens Protections For Online Learning In Higher Education

Yesterday, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos released her final regulations for online education, otherwise known as “distance learning.” In a press release, DeVos said, “These regulations are a true ‘rethink’ of what is possible for students so that they can learn in the ways and places that work best for them.”

But many worry these regulations put innovation and institutional burden reduction interests ahead of quality and consumer protection needs. In fact, some version of the word ‘burden’ appears 52 times in the final rule; the word ‘safeguard’ only appears 9 times.

Federal higher education law requires distance education programs to provide “regular and substantive interaction” between instructors and students, so students aren’t left on their own to learn – they’re paying to learn from experts

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Public school funding would stay flat despite higher coronavirus costs under Murphy budget

While the 2020-21 school year will be an unprecedented one, the state will spend the same amount on K-12 schools as it did in 2019-20 school year, under Gov. Phil Murphy’s revised state budget proposal.

The $335 million spending increase for schools that was originally proposed during the budget address in February has been scrapped, the governor said Tuesday during his budget address at SHI Stadium at Rutgers University in Piscataway.

Under the reworked budget, school aid remains flat at $8.7 billion while continuing the phase-in of the updated school funding formula, the governor said.

The formula funding is part of Murphy’s $32.4 billion budget for the nine months beginning Oct. 1, including $4 billion in borrowing and $1 billion in new taxes.

In May, Murphy informed districts of the plan to slash the extra hundreds of millions in aid as the financial fallout of the coronavirus pandemic — including

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ELECTION 2020: North Dakota voters to decide on expansion of state’s higher education board

The constitutional amendment would increase membership on the State Board of Higher Education from eight to 15 voting members and also increase term length from four years to six years. Additionally the measure would prohibit state employees, officials, legislators, from being members.

The board oversees North Dakota’s 11 public colleges and universities.

Board members are appointed to the position by the governor. They currently can serve up to two, four-year terms. The board also includes a faculty and staff representative, both of whom are non-voting members, and a student representative who can serve for a year who is also appointed by the governor.

The ballot measure would change the process of the student member slightly. Under the ballot measure, the student member would be appointed by the governor from a list of names recommended by the executive board of the North Dakota Student Association. The student member would not be

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