Graduation Celebration for Inuit Grads of First ilinniapaa Skills Development Program

Amanda Kilabuk
Amanda Kilabuk

On Thursday, September 17th, an afternoon of celebration will take place as Tungasuvvingat Inuit honours the first graduating class of the Inuit Community Support Worker and Management Trainee Program. The two-year program is a competency-based, nationally accredited diploma program designed and delivered through funding support by the Government of Canada’s Strategic Partnership Fund. The project was developed by ilinniapaa Skills Development Centre with support from Tungasuvvingat Inuit (TI).

TI Executive Director Amanda Kilabuk stated, “We are so excited to celebrate the graduate’s achievements and hard work. The program is important because it provides accredited and competency-based learning for Inuit with a goal of working in the social services field. The program has succeeded by providing new opportunities to the graduates and offering a high quality of learning through the courses offered. Courses were offered online to Inuit wherever they live and work and removed barriers to professional development

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Covid-Era Tech Grads Launch Careers From Parents’ Homes

Caren Zeng started a job at Google this month. She works from a bedroom at her parents’ house.

Photographer: Michael Short/Bloomberg

Eric Lee has dreamed of working for Microsoft Corp. for as long as he can remember, and was stoked this spring to land a job at the tech giant right out of college. But instead of traveling across the country to start his career at Microsoft headquarters in Redmond, Wash., Lee joined the workforce this month from his family’s house in the suburbs of Boston.

The arrangement has its comforts. Every hour Lee’s mom brings him a different type of cut-up fruit, then usually noodles for lunch. But he feels disconnected from his new colleagues in a way he wouldn’t if they were sharing an office. When Lee gets stuck on a tricky line of code, he sends a message asking for advice, then tries to

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Startup company founded by UB grads develops technology that streamlines process of detecting fevers

This thermal image was generated by Bifrost, a new technology that can detect the body temperatures of several people at once. (Image: Buffalo Automotion)

This thermal image was generated by Bifrost, a new technology that can detect the body temperatures of several people at once. (Image: Buffalo Automotion)

Wed, Sep 2nd 2020 11:40 am

Buffalo Automation adapted thermal-imaging technology it developed for self-driving boats to take temperatures of several people at once

By the University at Buffalo

Buffalo Automation, a startup company with roots at the University at Buffalo, is setting a new course that could eventually help organizations around the world better navigate return-to-work plans amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

The primary focus of the company, which was founded in 2015 by CEO Thiru Vikram and two fellow UB engineering undergraduates, has been to develop and implement AutoMate, an artificial intelligence (AI) system that enables ships and boats to essentially drive themselves. It uses thermal imaging to detect and steer around other vessels, buoys, swimmers, the shoreline and other non-water bodies during periods of

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