Night-time industry ‘set to lose 700,000 jobs without further Government support’, NTIA warns



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The night-time economy is “on the brink of collapse” with more than 700,000 jobs at risk — and the end of the furlough scheme could be “the final blow”, an industry body has warned.

A survey of Night-Time Industries Association (NTIA) members found 71 per cent of businesses are set to make “more than half” of their workforce redundant “in a matter of weeks”.

The Job Retention Scheme, which has seen the Government pay 80 per cent of wages for more than 10 million furloughed employees during the Covid-19 pandemic, is set to end on October 31.

Indoor performances at music venues have been allowed since August 15, although many venues such as nightclubs remain shut due to physical and financial issues surrounding social distancing.

The NTIA warning comes after the latest figures from the Office of National Statistics reported a drop in employment of

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The federal government is jeopardizing manufacturing jobs

MONTREAL, Sept. 17, 2020 /CNW Telbec/ – The federal government will soon publish the new Clean Fuel Standard (CFS). Although this reform has attracted less attention from the general public than the imposition of a carbon tax, it is once again Canadian manufacturing companies and consumers who will feel its effects. A new Montreal Economic Institute publication, prepared by economist Miguel Ouellette, shines a light on the unintended consequences of the CFS.

“Given Canada’s precarious economic situation during this pandemic, governments should show some flexibility when it comes to businesses, since many of them are struggling just to stay afloat,” says Miguel Ouellette. “Unfortunately, it seems that the federal government is about to take a step in the wrong direction by imposing a new fuel standard. With this measure, Canada would stand alone, placing its companies at a disadvantage with regard to foreign competitors,” points out the

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UPDATE 1-Dutch government boosts spending to support jobs during pandemic

(Adds updated economic projections)

AMSTERDAM, Sept 15 (Reuters) – The Dutch government will maintain heavy spending in an effort to counter the effects of the coronavirus pandemic despite a rapid deterioration of the state finances, its draft budget for 2021 showed on Tuesday.

The budget deficit is set to balloon to 7% of gross domestic product this year and 5.5% in 2021, while national debt is expected to hit 62% of GDP next year, as support for workers and companies struck by the pandemic is extended well into 2021.

“In these insecure times, the government chooses not to cut spending but to invest in job security, social safety nets and a stronger economy,” King Willem-Alexander said in his annual speech presenting the government’s new budget.

The Dutch economy is expected to shrink by an unprecedented 5% this year before rebounding by 3.5% in 2021, said the government’s main economic policy

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Government puts entire UK education sector on cybersecurity alert



a person sitting at a table using a laptop computer: null


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The government’s national security body has issued a nationwide warning to the UK’s school system concerning possible cyberattacks.

As students across the country return to school following the nationwide lockdown that curtailed the last school year, fears have arisen that institutions could face attack due to a lack of proper protection.

The warning from the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) says that schools and universities need to take steps immediately to make sure they stay protected. This includes moves such as upgrading cybersecurity protection, ensuring data is stored securely, and making sure systems are backed up away from the premises.

School attack

The NCSC says it has been investigating an increased number of ransomware attacks affecting education establishments in the UK, including schools, colleges and universities over the past few months.

“This criminal targeting of the education sector, particularly at such a challenging time, is

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The Modi government says it has no data on migrant jobs lost to Covid-19

The Indian government has denied having any data that can clearly say how many migrant workers lost their jobs to the pandemic.

Three members of parliament asked India’s labour and employment ministry today (Sept. 14) “whether the government has done any assessment of the job loss among migrant workers due to the Covid-19 crisis, and if so, the details thereof.” To this, Santosh Gangwar, minister of state for the labour and employment, responded that the government maintains “no such data.”

This response (pdf) on the first day of the much-delayed monsoon session of parliament comes in the backdrop of widespread job loss, especially among India’s internal migrants. According to a World Bank report in April, India’s coronavirus lockdown impacted nearly 40 million migrant jobs in India. This was particularly exacerbated when India went into an over two-month harsh lockdown on March 25, one of the strictest in the world.

India’s

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What the A-level debacle teaches us about algorithms and government

Students protest the government’s handling of their exam results. Photo: Isabel Infantes/EMPICS Entertainment

In the face of overwhelming public pressure and looming legal action, the government last week scrapped its algorithm for calculating A-level grades. This resolved pressing concerns about the algorithm’s accuracy and fairness, even if it also created fresh problems for students and universities. But algorithms will continue to play a growing role in public sector decision-making in the UK, across almost all areas and levels of government. It is therefore essential to learn the lessons of this debacle so that history is not repeated.

Much of the A-level controversy focused on substantive issues around how the algorithm operated. For example, was the government right to calculate grades based principally on a school’s historical results rather than a student’s academic performance, and to apply the algorithm only to cohorts of a certain size? These are critically important questions.

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Supreme Court stays Maratha reservation in UG admissions and government jobs in Maharashtra

  • The apex court said that status of those who have already taken benefits of the 2018 law shall not be disturbed.
  • The Socially and Educationally Backward Classes (SEBC) Act, 2018 was enacted to grant reservation to people of Maratha community in Maharashtra in jobs and admissions.

The Supreme Court Wednesday stayed the implementation of 2018 Maharashtra law granting reservation to Marathas in education and jobs but made it clear that the status of those who have availed of the benefits will not be disturbed.

A three-judge bench headed by Justice L N Rao referred to a larger constitution bench, to be set up by Chief Justice of India S A Bobde, the batch of pleas questioning the validity of the law granting reservation to Marathas in education and jobs.

The apex court said that status of those who have already taken benefits of the 2018 law shall not be disturbed.

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Lethbridge food banks prepare for uptick in demand as some government funding ends or changes



a store filled with lots of food: The Interfaith Food Bank in Lethbridge, Alta. is preparing for an increase in clients as government funding ends or changes in the coming months


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The Interfaith Food Bank in Lethbridge, Alta. is preparing for an increase in clients as government funding ends or changes in the coming months

Food banks in Lethbridge have been working hard to navigate what kind of demand they may see as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

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“We’ve been very lucky [that] our numbers have not been as high as we expected, mostly because people have been fortunate enough to be on government supports,” said Danielle McIntyre, the executive director at Interfaith Food Bank.

Read more: What we know so far about the CERB to EI transition

She said that as some of that provincial and federal aid starts to end or change, food banks are preparing for an increase in clients.

“We are now finally starting to see our numbers tick up, a lot of them because people have expended their time on

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Senate returns to stalled stimulus talks and government funding deadline

STIMULUS STALEMATEAnd we’re back! The Senate returns to Washington today after its summer recess, with a government funding deadline looming and Republicans looking to revive the stalled stimulus talks by pushing a new “skinny” proposal. But lawmakers only have a few weeks before they leave town again for the campaign trail, and as of right now, the path to a coronavirus deal is narrow at best and going nowhere at worst.

Majority Leader Mitch McConnell doesn’t even have 51 votes for the Senate GOP’s pared back coronavirus bill yet, let alone the 60 needed to overcome a filibuster, per my colleagues. And some Senate Republicans want to include language related to “school choice” programs, further complicating McConnell’s effort to round up GOP support for the package. (Though our friends at Playbook report that the White House will embrace a $1.5 trillion price tag this week, which represents some

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Walk-through cancer diagnoses and robotics muscles among groundbreaking projects backed by government

  • Six pioneering health technology research projects aiming to transform NHS healthcare delivery benefiting from £32 million government investment
  • projects include novel AI X-Ray scanner to diagnose cancer and osteoarthritis more effectively and robotic muscles to assist those who have suffered from a stroke
  • ventures part of the government’s commitment to help advance healthcare outcomes through its ambitious Research and Development (R&D) Roadmap and to increase R&D public spending to £22 billion per year by 2024 to 2025

Debilitating diseases such as cancer and osteoarthritis could be identified and treated faster and more effectively, thanks to 1 of 6 projects benefiting from £32 million government funding.

As part of a keynote speech on research and development at London Tech Week 2020, the Science Minister Amanda Solloway will today (Monday 7 September) announce 6 new projects aimed at developing revolutionary new technological approaches that aim to transform care and treatments in the

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