Pa. Gov. Tom Wolf vetoes high school sports attendance bill, setting up possible override vote in General Assembly

Gov. Tom Wolf, as promised, vetoed a bipartisan-backed bill on Monday that would have given local officials’ authority this year to decide whether to hold K-12 sports and activities and set crowd limits at events.

This action shows his determination to urge Pennsylvanians to adhere to his 25-person limit for indoor events and 250 for outdoor contests to control the spread of COVID-19, even though a federal judge has declared those limits along with other pandemic-related restrictions the governor ordered as unconstitutional. The Wolf Administration has requested a stay on that order while appealing U.S. Western District Court Judge William Stickman IV’s ruling.

In his veto message, the governor said, “We have been confronting extraordinary challenges with the COVID-19 pandemic. As we continue the fight against COVID-19, we need to continue to prioritize the health and welfare of Pennsylvanians and minimize public health risks. However, this bill does nothing to

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Gov. Herbert’s education adviser steps down

Tami Pyfer, who has served for more than six years as Gov. Gary Herbert’s education adviser, announced Tuesday that she will be stepping down.

The move comes as Herbert’s final term in office winds down, a time when senior staff members commonly leave. But it was a tearful goodbye for Pyfer, who has led on several major projects — pushing to get rid of letter grades in schools, fighting against education vouchers, and most recently directing how classrooms should reopen with precautions during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“She’s not a shrinking violet, as you all know,” Herbert said during a farewell party for Pyfer on Tuesday.

Herbert laughed as he described Pyfer as “exasperating” when she defended what policies she felt were best for students and teachers, but also “exciting” to work with during his administration. He said he’s unsure how he’ll finish his time in office without her — even

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Gov. Murphy dedicates $100M for in-person reopening

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NorthJersey.com staff writers Charlie Stile and Ashley Balcerzak discuss the revised budget Gov. Murphy unveiled Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2020.

NorthJersey.com

School districts that plan to reopen their classrooms this year can draw on a $100 million pot of cash to help keep their students safe from coronavirus, Gov. Phil Murphy announced Wednesday.

The money comes from the state’s slice of federal stimulus funds, of which another $60 million will help bridge the digital divide for students who can’t effectively learn remotely because of technical challenges. Murphy announced the funding from the football field at Somerville High School, one day after taking the field at Rutgers University’s SHI Stadium to announce his budget proposal for the shortened fiscal year that begins in October.

“These are not just wise investments in our community, they are absolutely necessary investments in our future,” Murphy said from the end zone at Somerville. “We know

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Gov. Ivey earmarks $72.3 million in coronavirus aid for higher education

Gov. Kay Ivey today announced $72.34 million of coronavirus relief money will go toward Alabama’s higher education institutions.

More than $27 million will be pumped into the state’s community college system, with $25 million to its four-year institutions, and the state’s independent colleges getting $20 million.

The money will in part go towards beefing up technology and infrastructure to help with remote instruction and distance learning. Ivey said the state has awarded more than $432 million since July to help continue education during the pandemic. Requests are still coming in for aid, she said. The state received $1.8 billion from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES Act) passed by Congress and signed into law by President Trump.

“My office has received numerous CARES Act funding requests, and we are eager to help as many folks as possible,” Ivey said. “We are still reviewing them to ensure they meet

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Abia: Gov. Ikpeazu reveals plans for Proposed University of Science and Technology

Abia State Governor, Dr. Okezie Ikpeazu, has received the report of the Exploratory Committee on the Establishment of Abia State International University of Science and Technology, Aba.

The Governor while, speaking after he was officially presented the document by the chairman of the committee, Prof Anya.O.Anya, at a virtual session, said, “Time has come for the people of Abia to embrace science and technology in order to remain relevant in the ever-evolving world.”

He also said that the project will fill a very important void of redefining the state and equally make a way for the present and future generation.

The governor, who made it clear that, he is mindful of the huge financial burden that comes with such a gigantic project, noted that by the grace of God, the idea will be achieved and will not be abandoned.

He, however, promised to thoroughly study the report and set up

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NC Gov. Cooper uses CARES money to hire more school nurses

Gov. Roy Cooper will use $95.6 million in federal coronavirus relief money to help students he said have been most impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic instead of on teacher bonuses as proposed by Republican lawmakers.

Cooper announced Wednesday that he will use his share of federal COVID-19 education aid on programs such as hiring more school nurses, academic programs for at-risk K-12 students and providing tuition assistance for post-secondary students. The money comes from North Carolina’s share of the Governor’s Emergency Education Relief Fund, a part of the federal CARES Act.

“Learning during a pandemic is an unprecedented challenge for students and staff, whether in the classroom or remotely,” Cooper said in a news release. “This funding should help protect the physical and mental health at schools, and help bridge the gap for students with unique learning needs.”

The General Assembly approved giving all teachers a $350 bonus this year.

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Gov. Holcomb proposes ‘solution’ for school funding

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The Indiana Department of Education has updated its guidelines to help school officials and parents decide how schools can reopen safely during the coronavirus pandemic.

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Gov. Eric Holcomb announced Wednesday what he called a “solution” to the school funding crisis that erupted last week when a top lawmaker said schools that didn’t open for in-person instruction would only get a percentage of the state dollars they were banking on for this year. 

Holcomb is asking the Indiana State Board of Education to delay the fall count of student enrollment — the day on which schools count all their students in attendance, and must designate them as in-person or virtual — through at least December.

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Eric Holcomb gives a a wide-ranging press conference in the Governor’s Office, Indiana Statehouse, Indianapolis, Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2019.  (Photo: Robert Scheer/IndyStar)

“This solution will put to rest lingering questions or

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Gov. Holcomb proposes ‘solution’ for school funding amid the pandemic

Gov. Eric Holcomb announced Wednesday what he called a “solution” to the school funding crisis that erupted last week when a top lawmaker said schools that didn’t open for in-person instruction would only get a percentage of the state dollars they were banking on for this year. 

How Indiana schools can reopen safely

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Eric Holcomb sitting on a table: Eric Holcomb gives a a wide-ranging press conference in the Governor's Office, Indiana Statehouse, Indianapolis, Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2019.


© Robert Scheer/IndyStar
Eric Holcomb gives a a wide-ranging press conference in the Governor’s Office, Indiana Statehouse, Indianapolis, Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2019.

Holcomb is asking the Indiana State Board of Education to delay the fall count of student enrollment — the day on which schools count all their students in attendance, and must designate them as in-person or virtual — through at least December.

“This solution will put to rest lingering questions or concerns,” Holcomb said in a press release, “so schools can continue to focus on opening schools safely and educating

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