The Apparent ‘Lazy’ Gen Z Reset Their Priorities During Coronavirus

The COVID-19 pandemic has shifted priorities and rewired behavioral patterns for many individuals in the past few months. These changes, however, are most pronounced among Gen Z (13-24-years old individuals) who have taken this health crisis in their stride and quickly adapted to their new lives — swapped classrooms with screen time, dealt with an uncertain exam calendar, and given up on night outs or evenings with friends. Many of them also went out bravely into a barren job market this year.

A recent study conducted by Ipsos, a multinational market research company, along with Isobar, the digital agency of Dentsu Aegis Network reveals how this pandemic made Gen Z shuffle their list of priorities and put their health and family ties above money or career in these trying times.

Generation Z, for those of you who do not know, includes those individuals who were born between 1995-2015. They are

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India’s Gen Z Risks Getting Left Out of Formal Jobs, Study Says

(Bloomberg) — India has been struggling with an unemployment problem and the coronavirus pandemic is making it even more difficult for its youngest workers to earn a decent living, shows an analysis by the London School of Economics.



a river running through a city: A pedestrian wearing a face mask crosses an empty road near the Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Terminus (CSMT) during a lockdown imposed due to the coronavirus in Mumbai, India, on Monday, June 1, 2020. Despite a strict two-month-long lockdown, the outbreak in India’s financial capital has snowballed, with the city now accounting for nearly a quarter of India’s more than 4,700 deaths and more a fifth of India’s over 165,000 infections.


© Bloomberg
A pedestrian wearing a face mask crosses an empty road near the Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Terminus (CSMT) during a lockdown imposed due to the coronavirus in Mumbai, India, on Monday, June 1, 2020. Despite a strict two-month-long lockdown, the outbreak in India’s financial capital has snowballed, with the city now accounting for nearly a quarter of India’s more than 4,700 deaths and more a fifth of India’s over 165,000 infections.

Workers in cities in the age group of 18 to 25 years were already much less likely to be in formal jobs and more likely to be employed informally and paid less, wrote Shania Bhalotia, Swati Dhingra and Fjolla Kondirolli,

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