Feds fund test for lead in school water

HONOLULU — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced an award of $222,000 in grant funding to assist the Hawaii Department of Health’s Environmental Health Administration (EHA) with identifying sources of lead in drinking water in schools and childcare facilities.

The State of Hawaii’s contribution to the project is an additional $696,000 from the technical assistance set-aside portion of the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund, for a total project worth $918,000. Hawaii’s project will include testing the drinking water for lead at outlets used for water consumption at 106 Department of Education schools and at 229 Department of Human Services licensed and regulated child care facilities.

The selected schools include those serving younger children, schools with greater than 50% of students receiving free or reduced cost lunch and older schools built before 1988.

The selected child care facilities include those that were not previously tested in 2008 as part of

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Keep the feds out of civics education

On Constitution Day, Sept. 17, President Trump announced that he would sign an executive order establishing a national commission to promote patriotic education. That same day, members of Congress introduced the bipartisan Educating for Democracy Act, which would authorize $1 billion for civic education.

Neither is a good idea, regardless of where you stand on the political spectrum.

The authors of the Constitution wisely did not list education as a federal power. As James Madison wrote in Federalist No. 10, Americans separate into factions when they think about questions such as how to educate young people, and no one faction should be able to tyrannize the rest. Nationally mandated civics education initiatives, whether they come from Republicans, Democrats, or members of both parties, open the door to having factions dictate to the rest of the country how to prepare children for citizenship.

Political science research has shown that top-down education

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EPSB letter details how school division will allocate COVID-19 funding from feds



A 2020 file photo taken inside an Edmonton school.


© Eric Beck/ Global News
A 2020 file photo taken inside an Edmonton school.

Edmonton Public Schools superintendent Darrel Robertson sent a letter to parents of students on Monday that outlines how his school division plans to spend money that the federal government has made available to support the safe reopening of schools during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Edmonton Public Schools will receive $37.4 million of this funding, which is just over three per cent of our operating budget,” the letter reads. “These are welcome funds for our division.

“We are faced with many unexpected costs for the 2020-2021 school year because of COVID-19.”

READ MORE: Coronavirus: Ottawa giving provinces $2B for back-to-school safety 

Watch below: (From Aug. 26, 2020) The federal government is making $2 billion available to help Canada’s schools reopen amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Last month, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced his government would be giving Canada’s

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Fed’s Powell: rates to stay low for ‘however long it takes’

(Reuters) – Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell on Friday said the U.S. jobs report for August was “a good one,” but noted that with gains likely to slow, the central bank is planning to keep its foot on the monetary policy gas pedal for years.

FILE PHOTO: Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell, wearing a face mask, on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., June 30, 2020. Tasos Katopodis/Pool via REUTERS

“We do think it will get harder from here — because of those areas of the economy that are so directly affected by the pandemic still,” Powell told National Public Radio in an interview, referring particularly to sectors like leisure, hospitality, travel and entertainment that depend on large gatherings made unsafe by the virus.

Even as U.S. employers added 1.37 million jobs last month, the total number of jobs regained since the crisis has only been about half the total lost,

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Fed’s Patrick Harker says jobs recovery will be slow, inflation at 2.5% would be OK

Patrick T. Harker, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia

Charles Mostoller | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Philadelphia Federal Reserve President Patrick Harker said Friday that it will take a significant amount of time before the U.S. sees unemployment figures return to their pre-coronavirus lows.

Harker, a voting member of the Federal Open Market Committee, also said he would be comfortable allowing inflation to rise as high as 3% so long as it does so at a slow and manageable rate.

He joined CNBC’s “Squawk Box” to discuss the central bank’s new inflation goal, which Chairman Jerome Powell announced Thursday.

“Right now, you’re seeing some signs of recovery, but basically it’s moving sideways,” Harker said of the U.S. labor market. “We still have 27 million that are on some form of unemployment and we won’t get fully back to the kind of employment — we had this great employment

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