Regenerative Engineering, Racial Profiling and Healthcare Disparities

Cato T Laurencin, the father of regenerative engineering and winner of the Herbert W Nickens Award, talks launching a new field, mentorship and addressing disparities in healthcare.

Please tell us about yourself and how you got to where you are today

I work at the interface of medicine and engineering and am also someone that is very much involved in issues of social justice. I grew up in Philadelphia and became interested in medicine at a very early age, and decided I wanted to become a doctor. I started college at Princeton (NJ, USA) where I met people who were fantastic mentors in engineering. At that time, I was not quite sure how I was going to combine engineering and medicine, but I pursued chemical engineering.

When I completed college, I went on to medical school at the Harvard Medical School in Boston (MA, USA) and partway through I decided

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Johnson & Johnson Seeks Female Researchers Working in Science, Technology, Engineering, Math, Manufacturing and Design

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J., Sept. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Johnson & Johnson today announced that it is accepting applications for its 2021 Women in STEM2D (WiSTEM2D) Scholars Award, aimed at supporting assistant or associate academic professors in the disciplines of Science, Technology, Engineering, Math, Manufacturing and Design. For three years, each recipient will receive mentorship from leaders at Johnson & Johnson and a total $150,000 ($50,000 each year). The deadline for applications is Oct. 15, 2020 at 9 a.m. HST, and guidelines and additional details are available here: https://www.jnj.com/wistem2d-university-scholars.

Launched in June 2017, the Johnson & Johnson WiSTEM2D Scholars Award aspires to fuel development of female STEM2D leaders, and inspire career paths in STEM2D, by supporting the research of the awarded women in their respective STEM2D fields.

Dr. Naama Geva-Zatorsky, one of the 2019 winners of the Johnson & Johnson WiSTEM2D Scholars Award, along with her team of researchers at

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Career opportunities available virtually at Engineering Career Fair | News



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College of Engineering Career Fair will take place Sept. 15 and 16 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., with more job opportunities than ever before.



Over 400 companies are registered for the 2020 Fall Engineering Career Fair, which will take place virtually on CyHire from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sept. 15 and 16.

The executive team at the College of Engineering has made it possible for 400 companies to attend the Engineering Career Fair, and 5,000 students are expected to attend.

Students will have opportunities for internships, networking and careers. Students who are not actively looking for an internship or job are recommended to go for networking opportunities. 

Since the fair is taking place virtually, more employers have registered to attend. This has allowed new employers who could not send representatives in the past to participate. 

Kate Cossa, program coordinator for the Engineering Career

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Control Engineering | Bridging the artificial intelligence skills gap for machine manufacturers

The cyclic nature of artificial intelligence and machine learning (AI/ML) projects, as presented in Dimecc’s Machine Learning Academy. Courtesy: Dimecc Ltd.

 

Learning Objectives

  • An AI skills gap exists for ML applications.
  • For Industry 4.0 environments more AI and ML knowledge is needed.
  • Education needs to change to help AI and ML.

Artificial intelligence (AI) talent is difficult to find, and few industrial companies have enough in-house AI talent. AI will transform many jobs, and companies should give every employee the knowledge they will need to adapt to new AI-enhanced roles. AI resources help implement new business models and better services, but user acceptance is required.

During the last decade, AI design, development and implementation has expanded in many sectors. Organizations are struggling with AI business potential understanding and with finding AI talent.

A growing number of countries have recognized the opportunities provided by artificial intelligence and have prepared a national

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Assistant director of NSF’s Computer and Information Science and Engineering to give virtual talk Sept. 11 | Vanderbilt News

By Jenna Somers and Jane Hirtle

Margaret Martonosi (photo by David Kelly Crow)

Margaret Martonosi, assistant director of Computer and Information Science and Engineering at the National Science Foundation, will speak at a virtual campus visit on Friday, Sept. 11, from 2 to 4 p.m. CT hosted by Vice Provost for Research Padma Raghavan. Faculty, students and staff are invited to register to attend the presentation and take part in an open discussion and Q&A session about CISE and its key focus areas, including cyberinfrastructure, computing and communication, computer and network systems and information and intelligent systems, as well as funding opportunities and NSF future directions in these areas.

Register for the event here. >>

“I am pleased to welcome my close colleague Dr. Margaret Martonosi to Vanderbilt,” said Raghavan, who serves as a member of the advisory boards for the CISE Directorate and the Office of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure. “Margaret

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COD Celebrates Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Sept. 21

College of DuPage will host a series of free virtual events during STEM Week, running Monday, Sept. 21, to Saturday, Sept. 26. The week will include daily social media highlights on the College’s Facebook and/or Instagram platforms as well as livestreamed videos via YouTube. All livestream events take place at 7 p.m. and can be accessed on the College’s Livestream page.

Register here to receive reminders about STEM Week live sessions.

“When people think of studying STEM, they don’t usually think about starting at a community college,” said COD STEM Outreach Coordinator Sara Spaniol. “We want to change that. STEM Week allows us to highlight all the amazing reasons why College of DuPage is at the forefront of STEM education. Participants will hear from faculty, alumni and current experts in the field, see some of our unique spaces virtually and learn how to fund their STEM education, among other things.”

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Seeking A Career In Science, Engineering Or Technology? Cultivate These 3 Key Skills

The global pandemic has brought a new level of realization to the nation’s scientists, technology workers and engineers. As the US turns to other countries for the production of vital materials (such as masks from China), Americans are wondering how we are going to go forward if we can’t get the stuff we need – and get it produced here in the United States. Before you can say, “global supply chain” and “lower wages in Asia”, consider the insights of materials management PhD and company co-founder, Brandon Sweeney. He says there’s a new way for engineers, tech workers and the companies they serve to create exceptional value, right here within the borders of the USA.

To be clear, this isn’t an article about the benefits of economic isolation or nationalism. Sweeney says that self-sufficiency is the goal –

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Streator, Princeton students awarded science, technology, engineering scholarships

The B+B SmartWorx Scholarships for the Internet of Things were recently awarded by the Starved Rock Country Community Foundation to Alexandria Schick, of Streator, and Cole Adams, of Princeton.

The IoT Scholarship is available to two high-school graduating seniors who will pursue a career in science, technology or engineering.

The award is $1,500 per scholarship and is granted to one male recipient and one female recipient in Starved Rock Country who are enrolled in a college or university for the coming school year.

“The B+B SmartWorx Scholarships are highly sought-after and always bring the most applicants of any of our scholarships,” said Pamela Beckett, President and CEO of the Community Foundation, in a press statement. “Our Scholarship Selection Committee evaluates the applicants without identifying information, so that their selections are not prejudicial. The Committee always has a tough time selecting the winners because of the number of highly qualified and

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