Robots won’t take away our jobs. They will make work safer and more efficient (opinion)

As a result of the Covid-19 pandemic, industries that did not previously pose a health and safety risk to workers — such as package and food delivery, travel, hospitality and even energy, transportation and construction — now do. Many of these jobs can’t be accomplished through Zoom, requiring a physical presence. So employers are looking to technology to help protect their workers from infection. They are relying on technologies like mobile agile robots to do the myriad of jobs that require a physical presence so human workers don’t run the risk of getting sick.



a person holding a bag of luggage: A worker loads groceries for delivery into a Starship Technologies Inc. robot in Mountain View, California, U.S., on Monday, May 18, 2020. Starship is a six-wheeled ground robot that can navigate streets and sidewalks autonomously, offering on-demand package delivery for consumers and businesses. Photographer: Nina Riggio/Bloomberg via Getty Images


© Nina Riggio/Bloomberg/Getty Images
A worker loads groceries for delivery into a Starship Technologies Inc. robot in Mountain View, California, U.S., on Monday, May 18, 2020. Starship is a six-wheeled ground robot that can navigate streets and sidewalks autonomously, offering on-demand package delivery for consumers and businesses. Photographer: Nina Riggio/Bloomberg via Getty Images

This pandemic-inspired partnership

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Highly Efficient Eco-Friendly X-ray Scintillators

X-ray Scintillator

A researcher holds a flexible X-ray scintillator developed by Professor Biwu Ma and his research team. The team has developed a new material that could be used to make flexible X-ray detectors that are less harmful to the environment and cost less than existing technologies. Credit: Biwu Ma / Florida State University

Florida State University researchers have developed a new material that could be used to make flexible X-ray detectors that are less harmful to the environment and cost less than existing technologies.

The team led by Biwu Ma, a professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, created X-ray scintillators that use an environmentally friendly material. Their research was published in the journal Nature Communications.

“Developing low-cost scintillation materials that can be easily manufactured and that perform well remains a great challenge,” Ma said. “This work paves the way for exploring new approaches to create these important devices.”

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