Department of Education’s Princeton Investigation — A Contrarian Take

Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs in Princeton, N.J., November 20, 2015 (Dominick Reuter/Reuters)

On Thursday, it was reported that the Department of Education is launching an investigation into race-based discrimination at Princeton University. The investigation comes after Princeton president Christopher Eisgruber did his best Harvey Dent impression — “Take the racist into custody, I am the racist” — on September 2 in a letter addressed to the Princeton community. In the letter, Eisgruber makes claims that “racism and the damage it does to people of color nevertheless persist at Princeton” and, even more damning, that “racist assumptions from the past also remain embedded in structures of the University itself.”

In a letter of its own, this one addressed to President Eisgruber, the Department of Education points out that these claims stand in contravention with Princeton’s past declarations that it has been complying with Title VI

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Education’s role in building back better for the planet

The COVID-19 pandemic is a stark reminder that we live in a socio-ecological system in which our human systems are deeply interconnected with our natural systems. Yet our education systems do not educate us to recognize, respect, or nurture this interdependency.

The zoonotic nature of the coronavirus has exposed how human-caused environmental degradation and destruction of wildlife habitats have increased human risk of exposure to new infectious diseases, not to mention contribute to the current climate crisis. At the same time, the COVID-19 economic shutdown has shown how changes in human activity can directly improve the health of the natural world. For example, climate scientists have documented decreases in air and water pollution levels in cities around the world as a result of widespread lockdown measures. The sudden halt in heavy pollution-emitting activities has demonstrated that rapid behavioral change is possible and that addressing the climate crisis is within our

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Sales rise for VR Education’s remote learning tools

Virtual learning company VR Education has reported strong sales growth driven by its flagship online platform, Engage.

The Waterford-based firm said revenue in the first six months of 2020 reached €681,000. That is 37pc higher than a year ago.

Chief executive David Whelan said the world’s adoption of remote working amid the Covid-19 pandemic has proved “transformational for VR Education”. He described the firm’s outlook as “brighter than ever – in stark contrast to the difficulties many corporates are experiencing with restrictions and shutdowns”.

Earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation (Ebitda) registered a loss of €0.9m, the same as in 2019.

But analysts said VR Education is well positioned for strong second-half sales, particularly for Engage.

That online virtual learning and corporate training platform generated 33pc of sales in the first half of 2020, up from 18pc a year ago.

A desktop version of Engage was released in December

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How higher education’s own choices left it vulnerable to the pandemic crisis

This article was produced by a partnership of NBCNews.com and The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education.

When Missouri Western State University declared a financial emergency in the spring, it was widely assumed to have been the fault of the coronavirus pandemic.

But that was only part of the problem.

In the decade since the last recession, Missouri Western had kept hiring, increasing the number of full-time faculty by 5 percent as its undergraduate enrollment was plummeting by nearly 25 percent. Other spending, too, continued to go up. The university overspent its budget by millions of dollars in each of the last five years. Cash reserves sank.

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Some members of the institution’s own governing board were surprised when they were confronted with these facts. By then, the president who had overseen that spending had retired.

“The problem

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