As Telemedicine Replaces The Physical Exam, What Are Doctors Missing?

Despite a foothold in medicine that predates Hippocrates himself, the traditional physical exam might be on the verge of extinction. The coronavirus crisis has driven more routine medical appointments online, accelerating a trend toward telemedicine that has already been underway.

This worries Dr. Paul Hyman, author of a recently published essay in JAMA Internal Medicine, who reflects on what’s lost when physicians see their patients almost exclusively through a screen.

A primary care physician in Maine, Hyman acknowledges he’d already begun second-guessing routine physicals on healthy patients as insurance requirements pushed doctors away from them.

But while Hyman is now providing mostly telemedicine, like many doctors during the pandemic, he writes that he has gained a clearer sense of the value of the age-old practice of examining patients in person. He notes the ability to offer reassurance, be present for his patients and find personal fulfillment as a doctor.

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Set yourself up for a great career in health: it’s about more than doctors and nurses | Clearing guide 2020

Fancy a career in the NHS? You’ll probably first think of becoming a doctor or a nurse, but in reality there are more than 350 different careers, not all of which are patient-facing. There are a host of specialist vocational qualifications in healthcare on offer at universities, and degrees in IT, computing, English or maths can open the door to jobs in health informatics, communications and finance too. Here are three unusual healthcare degrees and where they could take you.

BSc (Hons) in operating department practice
This three-year undergraduate degree leads to a professional qualification as an operating department practitioner (ODP). ODPs work in all three phases of surgical care. They are responsible for supporting the patient during the anaesthetic phase ahead of surgery, as well as preparing surgical equipment and drugs. During surgery, they are the link between the surgeon and the rest of the operating theatre team

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Opinion | ‘But I Saw It on Facebook’: Hoaxes Are Making Doctors’ Jobs Harder

The news came from a colleague — not a doctor but someone who works in the emergency room and has seen firsthand the devastation caused by the pandemic. “There is a cure for Covid-19,” he said. “It must be true because a doctor friend shared a Facebook post about this cure.”

When confronted with the latest, credible scientific evidence — that there is no cure for Covid-19, that the disease has killed more than 180,000 Americans precisely because we have no effective way of averting death for the millions who are infected — he doubled down. “But I saw it on Facebook,” he said.

In the emergency room and in conversations with the American public through cable news interviews and Op-Eds like this one, we’ve both been working to dissect and debunk the many myths about this new virus, its potential treatments and the possibility of a vaccine. We read

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