CFAC OKs $150 million for education funding; McGeachin calls for delay but skips meeting to attend Trump fundraiser | Eye on Boise

CFAC, the governor’s Coronavirus Financial Advisory Committee, voted unanimously today in favor of restoring the $99 million in school budget cuts and adding $50 million for Idaho families by tapping CARES Act funds, but Lt. Gov. Janice McGeachin, who skipped the meeting to attend a campaign fundraiser with Donald Trump Jr. in Stanley, submitted a letter calling for putting off the vote, saying it was “no small matter” and should be studied more. She was the only one to raise any objections.

Here’s the email McGeachin sent to her fellow CFAC members just 13 minutes before the start of today’s 1 p.m. meeting:

“Dear CFAC Members:

I am not able to participate in the meeting today, but I did want to express my concerns about the proposal before you today. Spending $150 million is no small matter and we have not had an opportunity to review fully the details of

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Indiana moves student count to delay school funding question

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INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The Indiana State Board of Education approved a method to maintain funding for schools reopening virtually this fall after warnings of possible cuts from lawmakers last month.

The unanimously approved plan allows the state to use data from the last student count in February to determine whether schools should receive full funding for their students, regardless of whether those students are receiving instruction virtually or in the classroom this semester.  

School budgets won’t be penalized for students learning virtually this fall, as long as the students weren’t enrolled in a full-time virtual education program on the last enrollment count day. 

“I am pleased the State Board of Education took action to implement the Department’s original guidance to provide 100 percent funding for impacted students who receive virtual instruction

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Governor backs delay to possible Indiana school funding cuts

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INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Indiana’s public schools would be assured of full state funding for the rest of this year under a plan announced by the governor Wednesday to sidestep a warning from a top fellow Republican that schools could face a 15% cut if they didn’t hold in-person classes.

Republican Gov. Eric Holcomb said he and GOP legislative leaders would ask the State Board of Education to delay an updated count of student enrollment until at least December — a step that will put off any changes in the state money going to school districts.


Holcomb said that would give assurances to school officials that decisions to hold only online classes to stem the spread of coronavirus infections would not deal a blow to their finances.

“Ideally, we want them in a classroom, but we want them in

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Governor Backs Delay to Possible Indiana School Funding Cuts | Indiana News

By TOM DAVIES, Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Indiana’s public schools would be assured of full state funding for the rest of this year under a plan announced by the governor Wednesday to sidestep a warning from a top fellow Republican that schools could face a 15% cut if they didn’t hold in-person classes.

Republican Gov. Eric Holcomb said he and GOP legislative leaders would ask the State Board of Education to delay an updated count of student enrollment until at least December — a step that will put off any changes in the state money going to school districts.

Holcomb said that would give assurances to school officials that decisions to hold only online classes to stem the spread of coronavirus infections would not deal a blow to their finances.

“Ideally, we want them in a classroom, but we want them in a safe classroom,” Holcomb said. “If that’s

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Labour urges delay to GCSE and A-level exams so students can catch up on education



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Labour has called for GCSE and A-level exams to be delayed by up to two months next summer in order to give students a chance to catch up on education missed because of the coronavirus.

The shadow education secretary, Kate Green, said that the annual series of exams for year 11 and year 13 pupils in England should be pushed back from May to June or July to allow time for extra learning.

And she said that the announcement on a new timetable should come quickly to avoid a repeat of the chaotic last-minute decision-making around this year’s A-level and GCSE results and the arrangements for this week’s return to classrooms.

In a letter to Ofqual in June, the education secretary, Gavin Williamson, confirmed that his intention was for exams to go ahead in 2021, and he asked the regulator to draw up plans for

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