Despite Trump’s Threat to Pull Funding, California Proceeds with Anti-Racist School Curriculum

On Monday, California unveiled its “Education to End Hate” initiative, a plan to offer anti-racist training to public school communities. The state is also moving forward with a mandatory ethnic studies curriculum for public schools despite threats made earlier in the month by President Donald Trump to deny federal funding to any schools that teach curriculum based on “The 1619 Project,” a New York Times Magazine feature examining the nation’s anti-Black political history.

While it’s unclear whether California’s new curriculum will actually incorporate “The 1619 Project,” the state’s educational plan seemingly defies the Trump Administration’s recent denunciation of anti-racism and diversity training programs as “divisive, anti-American propaganda.”

The “Education to End Hate” initiative seeks to “empower educators and students to confront the hate, bigotry, and racism rising in communities across the state and nation,” according to a press release from the state’s Department of Education.

The initiative will offer educators

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California Unveils Plans for K-12 Anti-Racism Curriculum

Illustration for article titled California Announces ‘Education to End Hate’ Curriculum, Trump’s Threats to Withhold Funding Be Damned

Photo: Sam Wasson (Getty Images)

California has decided to swipe left on y’all’s president’s threats to withhold funding from the state if it implements antiracism courses into its school curricula. On Monday, the Golden State unveiled plans to offer antiracist training to public school officials and students as well as mandatory ethnic studies courses for public schools.

Newsweek reports that California’s Department of Education defines the “Education to End Hate” initiative as a training program that aims to “empower educators and students to confront the hate, bigotry, and racism rising in communities across the state and nation.”

From Newsweek:

The initiative will offer educators $200,000 annually in mini-grants for receiving antiracism and bias training; allow students, educators, and families to attend a “virtual classroom series” to address modern-day discrimination and how to end it; and roundtable discussions between lawmakers, educators and prominent racial and social justice organizations

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