Space travel can lead to new motor skills but impaired vision, according to a new study of cosmonaut brains



a man talking on a cell phone: US astronaut Jack Fischer smiles as a NASA medical staff member wipes his face shortly after he landed back on Earth in a Russian Soyuz capsule in Kazakhstan, September 3, 2017. Sergei Ilnitsky/AFP/Getty Images


© Sergei Ilnitsky/AFP/Getty Images
US astronaut Jack Fischer smiles as a NASA medical staff member wipes his face shortly after he landed back on Earth in a Russian Soyuz capsule in Kazakhstan, September 3, 2017. Sergei Ilnitsky/AFP/Getty Images

  • A new study examined the brains of eight Russian cosmonauts seven months after they returned from the International Space Station.
  • Their brains showed signs of new motor skills, but slightly weaker vision. 
  • For some space travelers, those changes could be long-lasting.
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Imagine you could throw the perfect bullseye, but you’d have to wear glasses to do it. That’s a trade-off some space travelers may unwittingly make when they venture off the planet.

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A study published Friday examined the brains of eight male Russian cosmonauts roughly seven months after they returned from lengthy missions to the International Space Station. The researchers discovered minor changes

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