Advocates raise concerns about funding cuts on 33rd anniversary of Willowbrook State School’s closure

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — Advocates for the developmentally disabled gathered at the site of the former Willowbrook State School on Thursday to raise concerns about funding cuts.

Rally attendees, including parents and some former employees of the institution, raised concerns about a possible “return to Willowbrook” if New York is either unable or unwilling to adequately fund programs across the state.

Laura Kennedy, a parent advocate who has a developmentally disabled daughter, addressed the crowd gathered for the 33rd anniversary of Willowbrook’s official closure by former Gov. Mario Cuomo and called on his son to adequately fund the needed services.

“We are here today as advocates to express our fears and frustrations to Gov. Andrew Cuomo and his administration for their continuing neglect of people with developmental disabilities,” she said. “We gather here to protest the draconian budget cuts he has implemented and continue to implement.”

At least 100 attendees

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Stakeholders bring school funding concerns straight to Education Department

In the face of devastating cuts due to the coronavirus pandemic, stakeholders were at the New York State Education Department Wednesday pleading for a swift and equitable remedy.

Facing 20% cuts across the board, school superintendents were there, along with lawmakers and other stakeholders demanding a swift solution to a dilemma that impacts more than 700 school districts across New York.

What everyone is hoping for is that federal stimulus money will come from Washington, although there didn’t seem to be anyone at the news conference who thought if it were to happen, it would happen any time soon.

So there was a call for the state to come up with their own creative solution, whether it be higher taxes for the wealthy or creating a stock transfer tax on Wall Street investments.

However, beyond the issue of finding enough money, there was also a call for all school districts

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Minister admits he was warned about concerns over exams algorithm | Education

The education minister Nick Gibb has admitted he was warned about concerns that the algorithm used to determine exam grades could disproportionately affect poorer pupils.

In a round of media interviews on the morning GCSE results were published, the minister defended the standardisation system, insisting the model was fair but that it was implemented incorrectly.

He apologised to pupils for the chaos that ensued although was unable to give a firm date for the release of Btec results, which have been delayed, saying they would “hopefully” be out next week.

Asked about reports that ministers were warned weeks ago of flaws in the exams algorithm that left thousands of A-level students devastated and university admissions in disarray, he conceded he had been aware of the issue and a meeting had taken place.

The Times reported that Sir Jon Coles, a former director general at the Department for Education (DfE), wrote

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Growing concerns that special education students are falling behind as classes go remote

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Updated Aug 21, 2020 7:43 PM EDT

With more schools set to open next Monday, some districts are scrambling to hire school nurses. Less than 40% of schools employed a full-time nurse before the coronavirus pandemic. There are also growing concerns for the seven million children who receive special education services.

Remote learning has been a tremendous challenge for 6-year-old Calvin Latham.

“This spring a lot of kids with disabilities didn’t soar in that environment,” said Toby Latham, Calvin’s father.

The rising first-grader from Virginia has a brain malformation, making him one of seven million children in the U.S. receiving special education services.

“He needs hand-over-hand support for writing exercises and the cutting and gluing and the basic things a first-grader would do,” said Latham.

Many special education students are legally guaranteed services, like an aide, through individualized education plans, or IEPs. But in a May survey, nearly

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