Citi and Citi Foundation Expand Global Job Skills-Building Initiative to Improve Employability and Economic Opportunity for Underserved Communities

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Citi and the Citi Foundation today announced an expansion of the global Pathways to Progress initiative, led by a Citi Foundation investment of $100 million to improve employability and economic opportunity around the world.

Through Pathways to Progress, young people become equipped with the skills and confidence they need to make a positive impact in their lives and their communities, and also access employment opportunities to succeed in rapidly changing economies.

Since 2014, the Citi Foundation has invested approximately $200 million globally in Pathways to Progress programming. By 2023, the Citi Foundation expects to cumulatively impact over a million young people around the world with a total investment of $300 million. In the U.S., the program has served approximately 100,000 Black and Latinx youth over the past three years, and expanded efforts will focus more intently

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West Texas A&M creates a model to bring higher education to America’s smallest communities

It is not often a graduation ceremony comes to the student. And the number of times a ceremony that includes West Texas A&M University president Walter Wendler and four other top administrators driving 436 miles round-trip to present a bachelor’s degree to a graduate can be counted on one finger.

But there they were on the first Wednesday of September, burning up Interstate 20 and U.S. 84 to Roscoe, a town of 1,285 located 50 miles west of Abilene. Awaiting them, among others, was 19-year-old Amanda Sanchez.

There was a method to their mileage.

“We’re here to serve the communities that make up the Panhandle and South Plains,” Wendler said. “We’re not offering a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. What we’re trying to do if a student is interested in working hard and has a chance to gain a college education, we want to be here

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U.S. Covid Funding Flaw Shortchanges Hospitals in Black Communities

The federal government is doling out pandemic relief money to hospitals using a formula that discriminates against predominantly Black communities because, in general, less is spent on their health care even when their need is greater. The method used by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to help medical providers hammered by Covid is based on past revenue at those institutions. This shortchanges counties that have more Black residents, even though they have higher numbers of patients with Covid-19 — or with other conditions that put them at greater risk for it — as well as hospitals that are under the greatest financial strain, according to report published in JAMA last month. “Communities of color tend to spend less for the same health-care need for a lot of different reasons,” said Pragya Kakani, a Phd student in health policy at Harvard University who was the report’s lead author.

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Indigenous education strategy failing remote communities

Indigenous education strategy failing remote communities
A game of football being played on country. Credit: Wayne Quilliam

A policy of remote Indigenous students boarding ‘off country’ to advance their education opportunities is having the reverse effect.


The findings came in a major report, the first of its kind and led by Dr. Marnie O’Bryan and Dr. William Fogarty from the Center for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR) at The Australian National University (ANU), examined the educational outcomes of young people from a remote community in the Northern Territory over 10 years.

Worryingly, it found large numbers of high school students dropping out in their early teens, very low literacy levels, no high schools for them to attend and no educational alternatives.

The study found remote-living young people had no option but to leave home and attend boarding schools away from their communities for their secondary education.

The majority of students dropped out in years seven and

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