Massive Siberian craters could be tied to climate change | Science and technology

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Crater

An aerial view taken from a helicopter shows a crater on the Yamal Peninsula in northern Siberia.




YAMAL PENINSULA, Russia — A Russian TV crew flying over the Siberian tundra this summer spotted a massive crater 30 meters (100 feet) deep and 20 meters wide — striking in its size, symmetry and the explosive force of nature that it must have taken to have created it.

Scientists are not sure exactly how the huge hole, which is at least the ninth spotted in the region since 2013, formed. Initial theories floated when the first crater was discovered near an oil and gas field in the Yamal Peninsula in northwest Siberia included a meteorite impact, a UFO landing and the collapse of a secret underground military storage facility.

While scientists now believe the giant hole is linked to an explosive

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OVERNIGHT ENERGY: EPA head questions connection of climate change to natural disasters | Pebble Mine executives eye future expansion in recorded conversations

HAPPY TUESDAY! Welcome to Overnight Energy, The Hill’s roundup of the latest energy and environment news. Please send tips and comments to Rebecca Beitsch at rbeitsch@thehill.com. Follow her on Twitter: @rebeccabeitsch. Reach Rachel Frazin at rfrazin@thehill.com or follow her on Twitter: @RachelFrazin.



a large white building: OVERNIGHT ENERGY: EPA head questions connection of climate change to natural disasters | Pebble Mine executives eye future expansion in recorded conversations | EPA questions science linking widely used pesticide to brain damage in children


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OVERNIGHT ENERGY: EPA head questions connection of climate change to natural disasters | Pebble Mine executives eye future expansion in recorded conversations | EPA questions science linking widely used pesticide to brain damage in children

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QUESTIONING CLIMATE SCIENCE: A HOT ACTIVITY

At the EPA: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Andrew Wheeler said on Tuesday that there is “scientific debate” on whether hurricanes and other natural disasters are exacerbated by climate change.

In an interview with Cheddar, Wheeler said he believes in climate change, but hesitated when asked if it was connected to extreme weather events.

“You have

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EcoVadis’ New Carbon Action Module Will Tackle Climate Change and Drive Significant, Long-term Emissions Reductions

PARIS and NEW YORK, Sept. 22, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — EcoVadis, the world’s most trusted provider of business sustainability ratings, is launching a first-of-its-kind Carbon Action Module that’s designed to reduce emissions across the supply chain and enable organizations to step up their fight against climate change. The solution will be revealed during Climate Week NYC 2020.

A recent EcoVadis analysis of 40,000 global organizations revealed a massive shortfall in supplier carbon reporting and action. The research found that the majority of corporations today only address their direct and indirect emissions, while neglecting those that occur in the value chain. This represents an alarming and severe gap as value chain emissions, upstream and downstream, account for more than 70% of total emissions for manufacturers (IOP Science) and up to 80% for consumer-goods organizations (McKinsey).

“The climate crisis demands that we take urgent action to combat the impact of carbon

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U.S. and European Oil Giants Go Different Ways on Climate Change

HOUSTON — As oil prices plunge and concerns about climate change grow, BP, Royal Dutch Shell and other European energy companies are selling off oil fields, planning a sharp reduction in emissions and investing billions in renewable energy.

The American oil giants Chevron and Exxon Mobil are going in a far different direction. They are doubling down on oil and natural gas and investing what amounts to pocket change in innovative climate-oriented efforts like small nuclear power plants and devices that suck carbon out of the air.

The disparity reflects the vast differences in how Europe and the United States are approaching climate change, a global threat that many scientists say is increasing the frequency and severity of disasters like wildfires and hurricanes. European leaders have made tackling climate change a top priority while President Trump has called it a “hoax” and has dismantled environmental regulations to encourage the exploitation

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Coral killed by pineapples, goats (and climate) — Tuesday, September 8, 2020 — www.eenews.net

At an international conference last year, the U.S. Geological Survey director acknowledged climate change is harming coral reefs but focused his presentation on a smaller, politically safer problem: sediment.

USGS Director James Reilly traveled in September 2019 to the archipelago nation of Palau for the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force meeting, a twice-annual gathering of officials from the United States and its freely associated states in the Pacific: Palau, the Marshall Islands and the Federated States of Micronesia.

Reilly gave little to no data about corals’ response to warming, despite acknowledging it as one of the species’ top global threats. And his presentation concluded with a call for scientists to focus on “characterizing the affects [sic] of climate change” — an ambiguous statement that some experts say has been used by opponents of climate action to question scientific consensus and delay policy.

Reilly did get specific about some of the

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Melting Sculptures at Frost Museum of Science and Other Florida Locations Put State’s Climate Emergency in Spotlight

NBC 6 Chief Meteorologist John Morales to Moderate Virtual Town Hall, Webinars on Climate Crisis in September as part of Month-Long Series of CLEO Institute Events in Miami, Tampa and Orlando

One of artist Bob Partington’s melting wax sculptures

Can Florida’s swiftly rising temperatures actually melt a sculpture? It turns out they can, and in less time than you might think. The CLEO Institute has partnered with Miami ad agency Zubi and award-winning Los Angeles artist/inventor/director Bob Partington to show Floridians just how quickly. PHOTO/ 1stAveMachine, New York

Can Florida’s swiftly rising temperatures actually melt a sculpture? It turns out they can, and in less time than you might think. The CLEO Institute has partnered with Miami ad agency Zubi and award-winning Los Angeles artist/inventor/director Bob Partington to show Floridians just how quickly. PHOTO/ 1stAveMachine, New York

MIAMI, Sept. 03, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Can Florida’s swiftly rising temperatures

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AI, Space, and Climate Science

“We wanted flying cars, instead we got 140 characters” -Peter Thiel

The closing quarter of the twentieth century was peak tech innovation in the United States. AT&T’s Bell Labs invented the information age with the transistor and data networking, and many transformative technologies tangential to its core business: from solar cells to the Unix operating system to lasers.1 Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) brought about human-computer interaction with the initial computer mouse, as well as laser printing and Ethernet networking.2 In the 80’s Pixar was born, creating the first ever computer-animated sequence in a feature film with novel computer-generated imagery (CGI).3,4 At the same time Gates and Allen were hacking at something special that soon revolutionized computing, as were Wozniak and Jobs.5,6 Amidst the heyday of invention in the world of bits, the “space race” brought about massive innovation and accomplishments in

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Without better climate education in our schools, the climate crisis will continue to be a runaway train

Growing up less than an hour from the nation’s capital, I considered my education to be unparalleled. In fact, the county in which I attended grade school is the richest county in America. However, it wasn’t until my senior year of high school that I realized my education, and that of my fellow Americans, was severely lacking.

How? Well, while concepts such as parametric equations, rhetorical devices, civic disobedience, and more were thoroughly discussed by my teachers, there was absolutely no discussion about the climate crisis. 

The lack of climate change education

In fact, substantial climate education didn’t even come up till my senior year at my STEM-focused high school. See, I was fortunate enough to graduate from Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, which has been consistently ranked as the best and most rigorous high school in the United States. However, the only discussion of the climate

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