In 2019, public school teachers were paid nearly 20% less than other college-educated workers



a woman standing in front of a window: A teacher explains mathematics during a lesson with sixth graders, who are sitting at socially distanced desks, on the second day back at class since March (during the novel coronavirus pandemic) on May 5, 2020 in Berlin, Germany. Christian Ender/Getty Images


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A teacher explains mathematics during a lesson with sixth graders, who are sitting at socially distanced desks, on the second day back at class since March (during the novel coronavirus pandemic) on May 5, 2020 in Berlin, Germany. Christian Ender/Getty Images

  • A report from the Economic Policy Institute found that, in 2019, public school teachers were paid about 20% less in weekly wages than college-educated peers.
  • This was actually an improvement in the “wage penalty” from 2018.
  • Notably, these numbers are from pre-coronavirus — and therefore pre-recession.
  • The authors of the report highlight the loss of K-12 jobs during the pandemic, and emphasize the extra expenditures that the pandemic has required.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A new report from the Economic Policy Institute (EPI) found that public school teachers were paid about 20% less in weekly wages than college-educated peers in 2019.

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Prichard waterline extension project gets $1.5 million in funding | News

CHARLESTON — More than 300 homes, businesses and other industrial properties stand to benefit after more than $1 million in funding was allocated to a waterline project in Prichard, Wayne County.

Sens. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., and Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., members of the Senate Appropriations Committee, recently announced $1.5 million from the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) to replace and extend the Prichard waterline to the Heartland Intermodal Gateway facility (HIG) and the Prichard Industrial Park.

“West Virginia is home to many growing businesses, which need a strong infrastructure and qualified workforce. This project to expand the Prichard waterline will provide better infrastructure to the businesses in the HIG facility and Prichard Industrial Park. I look forward to seeing the results of this completed project and the economic benefits it will bring to the region,” Manchin said.

The HIG facility has been on the auction block for more than six months,

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Teachers union sues Cuomo over school aid cuts, claim governor’s spending power is unconstitutional

ALBANY — The state’s largest teachers union is suing Gov. Cuomo over funds withheld from school districts across New York and claims his spending power is unconstitutional.



Andrew Cuomo wearing a suit and tie: New York state Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks at a news conference on September 08, 2020 in New York City.


© Spencer Platt
New York state Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks at a news conference on September 08, 2020 in New York City.

The suit, filed Wednesday in Albany Supreme Court, argues that the state is illegally withholding $5.2 billion in school aid and that the governor has no constitutional authority to cut the budget despite sweeping powers granted to him by the Legislature amid the pandemic.

“Time is up,” New York State United Teachers president Andy Pallotta said. “With the loss of state funding driving cuts at the local level in districts around the state, we can’t just keep waiting for action at the federal level to fund our schools.”

Lawmakers gave Cuomo broad power to amend and cut the budget as

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Green School funding ‘technically impossible’ to withdraw, Taranaki teachers told

But the Green School was the elephant in the room.

“Taranaki, New Zealand schools – many, many, many schools are underfunded. They don’t have great property, they have holes in their roofs, their carpet is a bit messy, and then when a school like the Green School still gets all this money all it can do is cause concern.

“It’s unjust and unfair.”

Bradley said Shaw offered his by-now familiar apology for the “error in judgement”, adding that if he had his time again he’d make a different decision.

Ahead of the New Plymouth meeting, the expectations of Taranaki Secondary Schools Principals’ Association chair Martin Chamberlain were clear.

“We’re hoping, bottomline, for a retraction,” Chamberlian said. “I know the machinery of Government is complicated but anything else is much much less than ideal.”

But he didn’t get what he wanted.

“Ah, no. We found out that technically that was impossible.

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Greens co-leader James Shaw meets with Taranaki teachers over Green School funding blunder | 1 NEWS

Taranaki teachers were hoping to hear the Green Party’s James Shaw withdraw a controversial grant of almost $12 million to a privately-run Green School at a series of behind-closed door meetings around the province.

Green Party co-leaders Marama Davidson and James Shaw at Normanby School South Taranaki.
Source: rnz.co.nz


By Robin Martin for rnz.co.nz

Instead, they had to settle for a sympathetic ear, yet more apologies and a vague assurance that the funding will be turned into a commercial loan.

The Green Party co-leaders James Shaw and Marama Davidson went back to school yesterday to make good on a promise to listen to the teachers, many of who are angry about the Green School debacle and the contrast with other school communities putting up with shonky school infrastructure.

The Green Party top brass travelled around Taranaki visiting schools in Stratford, Normanby and Ōpunake before fronting a meeting in New Plymouth.

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Congress and Trump have unfinished business: Funding all schools

The beginning of a new school year is always a time of excitement for teachers, parents, and especially students as they look forward to reuniting with friends, meeting new challenges, and settling back into a routine of study. This year, because of the coronavirus pandemic, the usual anticipation has been mixed with a sense of anxiety.



a man wearing a uniform


© Provided by Washington Examiner


Our elected officials in Washington could do enormous good to ensure our children, teachers, and staff have the resources they need to sustain our schools through this pandemic. Both the Senate and the House have proposed tens of billions of dollars more for education. But after more than two months, no agreement has been reached, and a political stalemate continues. The result is the education and well-being of all schoolchildren suffer.

Here in the Archdiocese of New York, our school administrators have done tremendous work preparing for a

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New Hampshire’s School Funding System Fails Students, Taxpayers: Report

By GARRY RAYNO, InDepthNH.org

CONCORD, NH — The state’s current system is inequitable for both students and taxpayers, according to a recent report discussed Thursday by the New Hampshire Commission to Study School Funding.

The report by the American Institutes for Research found what many proponents of changing the current system have maintained: the education students receive in New Hampshire depends on where they live and that poorer communities pay higher tax rates for less educational resources resulting in lower student outcomes.

“New Hampshire’s current system of funding is not working for large segments of New Hampshire’s students and taxpayers. Specifically, communities with higher poverty rates and lower property wealth are doubly penalized under New Hampshire’s current system,” the report concluded. “Students in these communities, on average, receive fewer resources in the form of funding than students in wealthier communities.”

Commission chairman Rep. David Luneau, D-Hopkinton, said the findings “point

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Women of color have steeper climb when opening a business

GREENVILLE, S.C. – As a Clemson University student in the ’90s, Nekita Sullivan and her friends had to pile in a car and drive to Greenville, Seneca or Anderson for Black beauty products and hair care. 



a person standing in a living room: Nekita Sullivan, owner of Butterfly Eco Beauty Bar in Clemson, Friday, August 14, 2020. Sullivan opened her salon in February before being forced to close down in March due to COVID-19.


© MATT BURKHARTT/Staff
Nekita Sullivan, owner of Butterfly Eco Beauty Bar in Clemson, Friday, August 14, 2020. Sullivan opened her salon in February before being forced to close down in March due to COVID-19.

The inconvenience of traveling two or three towns over for beauty care gave Sullivan an idea: a multiethnic beauty bar where students and university employees of all races and hair textures could go in the heart of downtown Clemson. 

Sullivan finally realized that dream after more than 20 years, but she didn’t know how difficult it would be. 

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Women, especially women of color, face

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Schenectady teachers union joins school funding lawsuit against Cuomo

Categories: News, Schenectady County

The Schenectady teachers union and its president joined a school funding lawsuit filed Tuesday in Albany County, challenging the constitutionality of 20-percent reductions in aid payments to schools districts across the state.

The suit argues the state Legislature ceded its power to the governor in granting authority to withhold budgeted payments and that the governor has overstepped his authority in carrying out cuts the union says prevent schools from providing students a sound education.

Juliet Benaquisto, president of the Schenectady Federation of Teachers and a Mont Pleasant Middle School teacher, and Tracy Cimino, a recently-laid off paraprofessional in the district and the parent of a high school sophomore, are both named plaintiffs in the suit. The suit was filed by New York State United Teachers, a statewide union organization.

Facing a projected shortfall of $28.5 million if state aid reductions continued, Schenectady district officials slashed hundreds

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Enrollment drops in school district that includes Las Vegas

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Enrollment in the Clark County School District, which includes Las Vegas, has declined by more than 10,000 students during the start of the fall semester online.

Data show there are 307,210 students enrolled for this 2020 academic year compared to 317,893 students enrolled for the 2019 academic year, showing a drop of more than 10,600 students.

The figures show the third straight decline in enrollment since the district reached more than 321,000 students in 2017.

District officials had anticipated about 316,000 students this year, and depending on enrollment at each school, budget cuts are now expected. Each student brings in $6,100 in funding to the district, officials said.

“There’s funding tied to that count number. How it impacts my child in the classroom? Frequently it means larger class sizes,” Nevada Parent Teacher Association President Rebecca Dirks Garcia told KVVU-TV. “You may see changes in your

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